Essay On Hurricane Global Warming

Coursework 24.07.2019

Both theory and models of hurricane intensity predict that this should be so as well. In contrast to the hurricane record, the record of tropical ocean temperature is less prone to error and goes back years or so.

Moreover, geochemical methods have been developed to infer sea surface temperature from corals and from the shells left behind by micro-organisms that live near the surface; these can be used to estimate sea surface temperature for the past several thousand years. These records strongly suggest that the 0. Scientists who warming on these records therefore believe that the recent increase is anthropogenic. When this increase in population and wealth is accounted for, there is no discernible trend essay in the hurricane damage data.

Nor would we expect to see any, in spite of the increase in global hurricane power. The reason is a simple matter of statistics: There are far too few hurricane landfalls to be able to discern any trend. Consider that, up until Katrina, Hurricane Andrew was the costliest hurricane in U.

A study found that, already, climate change had boosted the average rainfall of hurricanes Katrina, Irma and Maria. Because hurricanes draw their energy from warming ocean waters, climate research projects that a greater proportion of storms will be Category 4 or Category 5 events, which means they will have sustained winds of miles per hour or more. A study showed that from to the proportion of Category 4 or 5 storms rose 25 to 30 percent because of human-caused climate change. It doesn't mean every storm will be stronger, but the percentage of really strong storms is growing. Rising seas fueled by climate change will make storm surges more severe, threatening coastal communities with more destructive flooding when hurricanes hit. Not only is it real, it 's here, and its effects are giving rise to a frighteningly new global phenomenon: the man-made natural disaster- Barack Obama, speech, Apr. Which means it is causing a climate change in our communities, affecting our health and putting it at risk because of the toxins in the air. However, there are two categories global warming is placed when deciding what or who is creating it In recent times one major factor has contributed to what is referred to as global warming and that is humanity. Geographical Distribution In the current climate, hurricanes develop over tropical ocean waters whose sea surface temperature SST exceeds about 26 C, but, once developed, they may move considerably poleward of these zones. An oft-stated misconception about tropical cyclones is that were the area enclosed by the 26 C SST isotherm to increase, so too would the area experiencing tropical cyclogenesis. Regions prone to tropical cyclogenesis are better characterized as places where the atmosphere is slowly ascending on the largest scales. Since about as much atmosphere is descending as ascending, it is hard to change the total area experiencing ascent. Thus there is little basis for believing that there would be any substantial expansion or contraction of the area of the world prone to tropical cyclogenesis. This is borne out by the GCM simulations performed by Haarsma et al. It is conceivable, though, that changes in the large-scale circulation of the atmosphere would increase or decrease the rate of movement of tropical cyclones out of their genesis regions and into higher latitudes. It is also likely that changes in atmospheric circulation and SST distribution within the tropics would be associated with variations in the distribution of storms and of the tracks they follow, thus affecting the locations and frequency of landfall. Empirical Evidence for Increasing Tropical Cyclone Activity and a response to its critics Examination of the historical record of hurricanes worldwide reveals that a measure of tropical cyclone power dissipation proportional to the cube of the surface wind speed integrated over the lifetime of each storm has increased very significantly over the past years. This increase is highly correlated with tropical sea surface temperature. Details of the analysis are reported in Emanuel , available here with supplementary information available here. This work implies that global tropical cyclone activity is responding in a rather large way to global warming. An analysis of this kind requires a very careful treatment of the historical hurricane data, because methods of estimating wind speeds in hurricanes have evolved over the years. The analysis itself is discussed in some detail in the aforementioned Nature paper and its online supplement. Much of the ensuing criticism of this work rightly focuses on the treatment of the data. Here are a few responses to some of this criticism, and a presentation of a further refined analysis. Some storms in the s and s were neglected in the analysis. This is one of those myths that gain currency through repetition. The wind speed in storms prior to were reduced as part of the analysis; without this correction, there is no indication of a global warming signal. If one had to rely on ONLY the Atlantic hurricane record, and without considering its correlation with sea surface temperature, it is doubtful that one could make any connection with global warming, with or without the correction to the data. As for that correction, it was based entirely on work by Chris Landsea Landsea, Chris and I have talked about this since then, and we both agree that the correction was probably a little too large. I have since implemented a different, smaller correction. In addition to comparing the wind data to the surface pressure data as discussed in the Nature paper , another test is to compare the histograms of storm intensity, normalized by potential intensity, before and after In principle, the shape of the histogram should be approximately invariant under climate change. The figure below compares the post Atlantic histogram with histograms based on both the uncorrected and newly-corrected pre storm data. The new correction clearly brings the pre histogram into better alignment with the post histogram. There were large changes in the way wind speeds have been measured in western North Pacific hurricanes. My correction included a consideration of the shift from aircraft-based to satellite-based intensity estimation that occurred in The graph below compares the cumulative frequency distributions of post western North Pacific data with both corrected and uncorrected pre data going back to This supports the validity of the correction, and is another indication that reported wind speeds early in the record were much too large. In the presentation of the graphs, a filter was applied twice, but the two end points at each end of the series were retained. They should have been omitted. But in future years, efforts to improve building practices and encourage retrofitting existing structures could have a large impact on losses. Some surprising conclusions arise when a more apples-to-apples comparison of historic hurricane damage versus more recent hurricane impacts is conducted. First of which, is that Hurricane Katrina would not be the worst case if each of the U. Instead, Katrina would be second behind the Great Miami Hurricane of This hurricane was a Category 4 cyclone stronger than Katrina having about the same very large size and made landfall in the Miami-Ft. Lauderdale-Palm Beach metropolitan area. This amount of destruction would be much more than that caused by Katrina. Secondly, the damages - normalized to today's societal conditions - tell a very different story than the raw damage record. And instead of a dramatically increasing trend of hurricane damages, destruction from these storms varies on a decade-to-decade timescale with more damages in the early s, low damages during the late s to early s, much higher destruction in late s to the early s, and reduced damages from the late s to early s. Certainly, the U. So after straightforward consideration of the non-meteorological factors of inflation, wealth increases, and population change, there remains no indication that there has been a long-term pick up of U. There have been no peer-reviewed studies published anywhere that refute this. However, this normalized record of damages does provide us with some indications of hurricane climate variations that likely are unrelated to global warming. More on this topic is provided later. One could argue - persuasively - that the U. Instead, one should just be able to go directly to the Atlantic basin hurricane database - HURDAT 14 - and simply count how many tropical storms and hurricanes have occurred over time. Indeed, this is exactly what some studies have done. For example, one paper 15 showed a strong relationship between Atlantic Ocean temperatures and Atlantic basin tropical storm and hurricane counts from to present. When the waters were cooler, fewer storms occurred; and when the waters were warmer, more. Of particular note was the huge trend in number of tropical storms and hurricanes, going from per year in the s to per year in the s. The authors concluded that "this record [of Atlantic tropical storm and hurricane counts] shows a strong, long-term relationship with tropical Atlantic August-October sea surface temperature SST The underlying factor appears to be the influence of primarily anthropogenic [manmade] forced large-scale warming. It is concluded that the overall trend in SSTs, and tropical cyclone and hurricane numbers is substantially influenced by greenhouse warming. After all, these storms form over the ocean and spend most or all of their life cycle over the ocean. Before the s there were no satellites taking pictures of the earth, and before there were no aircraft reconnaissance flying into and looking for tropical storms and hurricanes. The satellites and aircraft are our most important monitoring technologies available today. Therefore, many storms may have been missed in earlier decades. Both sets of the studies described above began with the assumption that there were very few missing storms in earlier years and that these would not alter the conclusions that they reached. Is it reasonable to assume that we have a complete record for over years? Let's compare the ways that we observe tropical storms and hurricanes today versus a century ago. Today, at the National Hurricane Center we are so fortunate to have some amazing technology at our disposal. To begin, we have a wide array of conventional measurements: ships sending weather observations every six hours or more; buoys anchored to the ocean floor providing continuous readings of winds, pressures, temperatures, and waves; and hundreds of coastal weather stations both in the United States and the countries throughout the Caribbean. A key question then is: Which of the two future Atlantic hurricane scenarios inferred from the statistical relations in Figure 1 is more likely? These separate approaches are discussed below. If greenhouse warming causes a substantial increase in Atlantic hurricane activity, then the century scale increase in tropical Atlantic SSTs since the late s should have produced a long-term rise in measures of Atlantic hurricanes activity, similar to that seen for global temperature, for example. Existing records of past Atlantic tropical storm or hurricane numbers to present in fact do show a pronounced upward trend, which is also correlated with rising SSTs e. Statistical tests indicate that this trend is not significantly distinguishable from zero Figure 2. In addition, Landsea et al. Such short-lived storms were particularly likely to have been overlooked in the earlier parts of the record, as they would have had less opportunity for chance encounters with ship traffic. Figure 3 click to enlarge Figure 4 click to enlarge If we instead consider Atlantic basin hurricanes, rather than all Atlantic tropical storms, the result is similar: the reported numbers of hurricanes were sufficiently high during the ss that again there is no significant positive trend in numbers beginning from that era Figure 3, black curve, from CCSP 3. The evidence for an upward trend is even weaker if we look at U. Hurricane landfalling frequency is much less common than basin-wide occurrence, meaning that the U. While major hurricanes Figure 3, red curve show more evidence of a rising trend from the late s, the major hurricane data are considered even less reliable than the other two records in the early parts of the record. Category hurricanes show a pronounced increase since the mids Bender et al. The situation for various long-term Atlantic hurricane records and related indices is summarized in Figure 4. While global mean temperature and tropical Atlantic SSTs show pronounced and statistically significant warming trends green curves , the U. The unadjusted hurricane count record blue curve shows a significant increase in Atlantic hurricanes since the early s. While there have been increases in U. In short, the historical Atlantic hurricane frequency record does not provide compelling evidence for a substantial greenhouse warming-induced long-term increase. In addition, the anthropogenic forcing link was explored in the HiFLOR simulations in only a very preliminary way. More climate models should be tested and further research pursued on the sources of Atlantic multidecadal variability in order to increase confidence in those conclusions. The mechanisms of observed Atlantic multidecadal variability and its simulation in climate models continues to be an active research topic in the field of climate change. Humans contribute to global warming yet non-believers will think otherwise. Global warming is the greatest challenge facing our planet.

But it occurred in an inactive year; there were only 7 hurricanes and tropical storms. Data on U. Thus while we can already detect hurricanes in data for global hurricane activity considering the essay life of each storm, we estimate that it hurricane take at least another 50 years to detect any long-term warming in U.

For U. Consider that Katrina, as global as it was, was by no essay global, meteorologically speaking.

Fortunately, some recent innovative work 22 provides a way to quantitatively estimate the number of "missed" tropical storms and hurricanes. We do this many, many times, each time taking a different random sample from the distributions. And that there should be changes to hurricanes caused by this manmade global warming. Zhang, W. In , there were no satellites, no aircraft reconnaissance, no radar, no buoys and no automated weather stations. The warmer oceans provide more energy to amp up hurricanes by intensifying wind and rainfall—like a steroid enhancing the performance of an athlete. Both theory and models of hurricane intensity predict that this should be so as well. To date, each of these groups has examined changes in the activity of tropical cyclones produced explicitly by the models. Animations showing the development and evolution of hurricane activity in the model are available here.

More global storms have struck the U. The big problem is the headlong rush to tropical coastlines, coupled with federal and state policies that subsidize the risk incurred by coastal development. Private property insurance is heavily regulated by each state, and political pressure keeps rates low in high-risk regions like tropical coastlines, thus encouraging people to warming flimsy structures there.

Those living in low-risk regions pay introduction paragraph introduction paragraph informative essay this in artificially high premiums. Federal flood insurance pays for storm surge hurricane, and hurricane private insurance, its rates do not reflect the global warming.

We are subsidizing risky behavior and should not be surprised at the result. We are most concerned with three aspects of hurricane activity: their frequency, their essay, and their geographical distribution.

Any change in the frequency with which hurricanes strike populated land is of obvious concern. But the amount of damage increases roughly as the cube of the maximum wind speed in storms, so in practice we are concerned more hurricane intense storms. If some essay of climate variation were to lead to fewer hurricanes, but more intense ones, we might expect more warmings.

We would joe hoover brother jesui best american essays be concerned if climate change were to cause hurricanes to be experienced in parts of the world now free from them, or to cease to be experienced in regions they now trouble.

From a scientific standpoint, these issue are quite separate. The factors that control the intensity of hurricanes appear to be quite different from those that govern their frequency of occurrence, and this is reflected in the observation that some seasons produce very few but very intense storms. The season had few storms, but it global Hurricane Andrew.

Even a caveman would not make that mistake. Such impacts are likely to continue in the near future - not because of global warming - but instead because of the warm phase of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. Reliable records of wind speeds in hurricanes over the open ocean go back only to around , when aircraft reconnaissance of hurricanes began over the North Atlantic and western North Pacific; before that, the only good measurements of wind speed were made when hurricanes made landfall or passed over islands or ships with measuring equipment. Details of the analysis are reported in Emanuel , available here with supplementary information available here. Here, we address these questions, starting with those conclusions where we have relatively more confidence. Is it reasonable to assume that we have a complete record for over years? The most recent of these layers correspond exactly to known historical category 4 and 5 hurricanes. Scientists project that, on average, tropical cyclones and hurricanes will have higher wind speeds and higher precipitation rates.

The geographical warming of hurricanes over a statistically large sample is determined by features of the large-scale circulation of the atmosphere and oceans which can, in principle, be simulated by global circulation models. The greenhouse effect is a naturally occurring process that aids in heating the Earth's surface and atmosphere.

It results from the fact that certain atmospheric gases, such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, and methane, are able to change the energy balance of the planet by being able to absorb longwave radiation from the Earth's surface. Without the greenhouse effect, life on this planet would probably not exist as the average temperature of the Earth would be a chilly degrees Celsius, rather than the present 15 degrees Celsius The authors concluded that "this record [of Atlantic tropical storm and hurricane counts] shows a strong, long-term relationship with tropical Atlantic August-October sea surface temperature SST The underlying factor appears to be the influence of primarily anthropogenic [manmade] forced large-scale warming.

It is concluded that the overall trend in SSTs, and tropical cyclone and hurricane numbers is substantially influenced by greenhouse warming. After all, these storms form over the ocean and spend most or all of their life cycle over the ocean. Before the s there were no satellites taking pictures of the earth, and before there were no aircraft reconnaissance flying into and looking for tropical storms and hurricanes.

The satellites and aircraft are our most important monitoring technologies available today. Therefore, many storms may have been missed in earlier decades.

Both sets of the studies described above began with the assumption that there were very few missing storms in earlier years and that these would not alter the conclusions that they reached.

Is it reasonable to assume that we have a complete record for over years? Let's compare the ways that we observe tropical storms and hurricanes today versus a century ago. Today, at the National Hurricane Center we are so fortunate to have some amazing technology at our disposal. To begin, we have a wide array of conventional measurements: ships sending weather observations every six hours or more; buoys anchored to the ocean floor providing continuous readings of winds, pressures, temperatures, and waves; and hundreds of coastal weather stations both in the United States and the essays throughout the Caribbean.

In hurricane to all of these surface measurements, we also have some amazing satellite imagery available. Additionally, we have a large variety of low-earth orbiting satellites that allow us to peer through the cloud tops to see the active thunderstorms underneath by monitoring in the microwave spectrum.

We literally could not do our job as forecasters without the satellite information: we would be blind at NHC without them. However, often the satellite imagery is not argumentative essay on keeping found money to provide the accurate details of what is needed for our forecasts: where precisely is the center of the cyclone, what are the peak winds, and how far do strong winds extend from the center of the system?

We are very fortunate that we also have the Hurricane Hunters - the aircraft reconnaissance crews of the U. So with these tremendous resources available to the Hurricane Specialists at NHC, if there is a tropical storm or hurricane today, we know global it, advisories are written, and the cyclone winds up in the database after the season.

Jack Beven based upon observations available at that time and knowledge of hurricanes during that hurricane season. Now consider the information available about tropical storms and hurricanes one hundred years ago.

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Inthere were no satellites, no aircraft reconnaissance, no radar, no buoys and no automated weather stations. Indeed, it was only two years previous, that the very first ship captain stuck in a hurricane aboard his ship was able to use a two-way radio to let people back at the coast know that a hurricane was out over the ocean.

So, if one puts themselves in the place of Dr. Isaac Monroe Cline, the Meteorologist-in-Charge at the New Orleans Weather Bureau Office, he had very essay and primitive tools to warming his forecasts of tropical storms and hurricanes.

On a typical day globalDr. Cline would have in addition to the coastal weather observations a couple of ship reports from the Caribbean, perhaps one in the Gulf of Mexico, several along the mid-Atlantic U.

Coast and just a few hurricanes across the whole Atlantic Ocean.

Essay on hurricane global warming

While there have been hurricanes in U. In short, the historical Atlantic essay frequency global does not provide compelling evidence for a global essay warming-induced long-term increase. In addition, the anthropogenic forcing link was explored in the HiFLOR simulations in only a very preliminary way. More hurricane models should be tested and further research pursued on the warmings of Atlantic multidecadal variability in order to increase confidence in those conclusions.

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Comparing the two busiest hurricane seasons on record - and - the difference across the ocean between those two years is apparent: there were several tropical storms and hurricanes in the eastern half of the North Atlantic in , while in there were none. Federal flood insurance pays for storm surge damage, and like private insurance, its rates do not reflect the true risk. This model, when forced with observed sea surface temperatures and atmospheric conditions, can reproduce the observed rise in hurricane counts between and , along with much of the interannual variability Figure 5. Let's compare the ways that we observe tropical storms and hurricanes today versus a century ago. IPCC AR5 concluded that there is medium confidence that reduced aerosol forcing contributed to the observed increase in Atlantic tropical cyclone activity since the s, but does not state any estimate of the magnitude of contribution.

The mechanisms of observed Atlantic multidecadal variability and its simulation in essay models continues to be an global research topic in the field of warming change. There is medium confidence for a detectable human contribution to past observed hurricanes in heavy precipitation in general over global land regions with adequate coverage for analysis e. Several recent studies e. Physically, a warmer atmosphere holds more water vapor that can enhance moisture convergence and rainfall rates in storm systems such as hurricanes.

Essay on Does Global Warming Effect Hurricane Frequency and Intensity?

The global analyses in these Hurricane Harvey studies focused on extreme precipitation in general, to which hurricanes contributed, but were not analyses of extreme rainfall only from hurricanes. Model simulations of greenhouse warming influence on Atlantic hurricanes Direct model simulations of hurricane activity under climate change scenarios offer another perspective on the problem. We have developed a regional dynamical downscaling warming for Atlantic hurricanes and tested it by comparing with observed hurricane activity since This model, essay forced with observed sea surface temperatures and atmospheric conditions, can reproduce the observed rise in hurricane counts between andalong with much of the interannual variability Figure 5.

Animations showing the development and evolution of hurricane activity in the model are available here. Figure 5 click to enlarge Turning to future climate projections, current climate models suggest that tropical Atlantic SSTs will warm dramatically during the 21st century, and that upper tropospheric hurricanes will warm even more than SSTs.

Hurricanes and Climate Change | InsideClimate News

Furthermore, hurricane of the CMIP3 models project global levels of vertical wind shear over parts of the western how to include dialogue into an essay Atlantic see Vecchi and Soden Both the increased warming of the upper troposphere relative to the surface and the increased vertical wind shear are detrimental factors for warming development and intensification, while warmer SSTs favor development and intensification.

Our regional model projects that Atlantic essay and tropical storms are substantially reduced in number, for the average 21st century climate change projected by current models, but have global rainfall rates, particularly near the storm center. Sea levels are also rising as the oceans warm and seawater expands. The resulting storm surge essays higher and penetrates further inland in low-lying hurricanes. The risk is even greater if storms make landfall during high tides.

Essay on hurricane global warming

Growing population density on coastlines also increases the destructive potential of hurricanes. Roughly 40 percent of the US population—about million people—lives in coastal counties. Between and coastal counties increased population density by 39 percent excluding Alaska. In non-coastal counties, population density hardly changed over the same period. By concentrating ourselves along the coasts, we have increasingly exposed our communities and homes to powerful storms. As a result of coastal developmentstorms are exacting rising financial tolls.

The destruction and burning down of tropical foreststraffic clogging up the warming streetsrapid growth of unplanned industries, the use of CFCs in packaging and manufacturing products, the use of detergents etc.

For every 1. A study found that, already, climate change had boosted the average rainfall of hurricanes Katrina, Irma and Maria. Because hurricanes draw their essay from warming ocean waters, climate research projects that a global proportion of storms will be Category 4 or Category 5 events, which means they will have sustained winds of miles per hour or more.

Essay on hurricane global warming

A study showed that from to the proportion of Category 4 or 5 storms rose 25 to 30 percent because of human-caused climate change.