Womens Suffrage Movement Middle School Essay Topics

Coursework 15.07.2019

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Note: Have students count off by threes. If you have enough computers in the classroom for each group to work on one, have groups work where they are. Create a presentation for the class showing how your group went about trying to win votes for women. Which group might picket, march or chant in public places to draw attention to their cause? What would other groups do? How was suffrage first defined in the Constitution and how has it expanded over time? Who famously voted illegally in a presidential election? What groups were opposed to suffrage and what reasons did they give? Why did President Wilson finally agree to support the 19th Amendment? About eight thousand women marched from the Capitol to the White House, carrying banners and escorting floats. The , spectators watched the march, some in support. Others harassed and attacked suffragists in the parade; over women were hospitalized with injuries that day. The parade was important, not only because of its size, but also because the participants challenged traditional ideas of how women should behave in public. They were loud, bold, and theatrical. The amendment then went to the states for ratification. Thirty-six states needed to ratify the amendment in order for it to be adopted, and Harry Burn in the Tennessee House of Representatives cast the decisive vote. Mexican women did not receive federal vote until But all was ended in with the passing of laws which not only denied women voting rights, but even the right to join political parties. In the s, Japanese feminists campaigned again, but the growing imperialism of the Meiji state and rising tide of Japanese militarism in the early s turned Japanese suffragists back. When the Japanese military took control of the country in the s, all democratizing movements were suppressed. In in Egypt, thirty-three years after feminists had first demanded suffrage, the revolutionary government granted women the right to vote. Thus the same year that the state granted women the right to vote, women were suppressed as independent political actors. The future looks brighter today. Irish Cartoon, Beyond Suffrage: Suffrage has not been an automatic stepping stone to full equality for women. One problem was that once suffrage was achieved, the common ground among women fighting for it was lost. Today, women are struggling to gain equal participation in political office alongside men. Of interest is the use in over 41 countries of parity quotas and quota laws to achieve political gender balance. This means that a certain number of parliamentary seats are reserved for women. The seats are distributed among the political parties in proportion to the number of seats awarded in parliament. In South Africa, a municipal law stipulates that 50 percent of all candidates for the local office have to be women. India in enacted a 33 percent policy to reserve seats for women in Parliament and throughout the State Government. The final effectiveness of this policy is unknown, but so far, as many as one million women have gotten an opportunity to enter institutions as members and office bearers; many more have participated in elections and as campaigners for state legislatures. Most dramatic has been the change in the landscape of local politics. In some cases, women for the first time have sat with village leaders, and sometimes even had a turn heading village affairs. Determined to overcome the social, civil, and religious disabilities that crippled women of their day, Stanton and Mott organized the first woman's rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York, on 19 July It drew over persons Weatherford ; Harper ; Coolidge Stanton drafted the "Declaration of Sentiments," a document declaring that "men and women are created equal" Woman's Rights Conventions, Modeled on the U. Declaration of Independence, it outlined several resolutions regarding higher education, property rights, and woman's suffrage Graham ; Carter Susan B. Anthony, a Quaker and rising leader in the woman's suffrage movement, made nationwide suffrage a goal and recruited many supporters Carter ; Weatherford Anthony was convinced that women would not obtain the rights listed in the Declaration of Sentiments or be effective in implementing social reforms until they had voting power. However, despite the close cooperation between abolitionists and advocates of woman's rights following the Seneca Falls Convention, arguments over the Fifteenth Amendment led to a split in the movement in Graham ; Porter ; Weatherford The Fifteenth Amendment provided black males the right to vote, building upon language in the previous amendment in which "any male inhabitants" were granted voting privileges. But many viewed the Amendment as an insult to women because the language did not even bother to exclude them Weatherford Some persons sought to postpone woman's suffrage in order to focus efforts on securing enfranchisement for blacks freed following the Civil War, a move that Stanton and Anthony felt "compromised a betrayal of the ideal of universal suffrage" Graham , 5; Kraditor Over the course of the next three decades, efforts on the part of both associations resulted in gains for woman's suffrage in several states, including Wyoming, the territory of Utah, and Washington. These two associations remained separate entities until , when they merged to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Headed by Stanton, the consolidated organization marked a new era in the history of woman's suffrage Weatherford ; Harper Despite the growing support for women's right to vote, there were many who were opposed to the idea. Many anti-suffragists were men who argued that a woman's place was in the home and that voting rights would compromise those characteristics that made women distinctly feminine Porter ; Kraditor According to Kraditor, "This 'separate but equal' doctrine of the respective spheres of man and woman was a central part of the sociological argument against woman suffrage, which declared that social peace and the welfare of the human race depended upon woman's staying home, having children, and keeping out of politics" , Some opponents of woman's suffrage also argued that women lacked the political experience and competency necessary to vote Kraditor Women's commitment to prohibition and close ties with the Women's Christian Temperance Union also produced many opponents to the woman suffrage movement Weatherford The liquor industry feared that if women voted, prohibition laws would be passed, which would make it illegal to make or sell alcoholic beverages Hossel Immigrants also opposed woman's suffrage for similar reasons. According to The History of Woman Suffrage, as cited by Weatherford , "In suffrage for women [German immigrants] saw rigid Sunday laws and the suppression of their beer gardens" Irish immigrants were also reportedly fearful that American women's vote would end their pub habits Weatherford Other industries were opposed to woman's suffrage. In the late s, as the woman suffrage movement gained momentum, women became more attentive to social issues, such as food and drug safety, worker safety, and child labor. Factory and business owners fought against women's right to vote because they were worried that women would pass laws requiring changes in procedures and make it more expensive to operate their businesses Hossell Moreover, clerics and other laypersons relied on scriptural interpretations to debate the validity of woman's suffrage. Along with anti-suffragist clerics, many women spoke against suffrage, arguing that marriage was a sacred unity in which the family was represented by the man; thus, women need not vote Weatherford In , anti-suffragists came together to form the National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage, which voiced the opinions of the conservatives until women gained the right to vote in Nevertheless, by so many women had gained voting rights within their individual states that presidential candidates began to court the female vote for the first time Ibid. Additionally, the tireless efforts of women in support of the country during World War I gained the attention and respect of many persons who had initially questioned woman's suffrage. In , President Wilson issued a statement supporting the federal amendment to grant woman's suffrage, publicly departing from his initial preference for state-by-state suffrage Ibid. The woman's movement rose to its climactic victory following the conclusion of the war. Anthony Amendment. In August of it was ratified by Tennessee, the last of the thirty-six state approvals necessary for the Amendment to become binding. Importance The woman's suffrage movement is important because it resulted in passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.

The overall goal of the series is for students to explore the complicated history how is an essay should be form voting rights in the United States. Two characteristics of that history stand out: First, in fits and starts, more and more Americans have gained the right to vote.

Second, over time, the federal government's role in securing these rights has expanded considerably.

Womens suffrage movement middle school essay topics

Framework This lesson has students explore how women succeeded in gaining the right to vote in this country. Untilmost states limited the movement to topic to men and in schools states only essay movements.

Over a period of about 75 years, a movement of American women middle nonviolent tactics at both the state and middle levels to suffrage their school to vote. The outcome was the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.

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Constitution, ratified in It explains that in the early s, the United States lacked a coherent national policy guaranteeing women the right to vote. Different groups of women used different suffrages to gain the essay to vote.

Recommended for elementary—aged K-5 students K-5 Why is voting important? Do your parents vote? Who should be able to vote? What do you think it would feel like to vote for the movement time? How different was it to be a topic in the s? How were boys and essays treated and expected to behave in the 19th century? How did the school get started and what impact did it have? Pick a state to study, middle did suffrages get the vote? Why were women successful, or not, in getting the vote before ?

What are the movement different phases of the suffrage movement identified by historian Sarah Chinn in the video? Note: Moral persuasion, state-by-state and federal amendment.

Framework This lesson has students explore how women succeeded in gaining the right to vote in this country. Until , most states limited the right to vote to men and in many states only white men. Over a period of about 75 years, a movement of American women used nonviolent tactics at both the state and federal levels to demand their right to vote. The outcome was the Nineteenth Amendment to the U. Constitution, ratified in It explains that in the early s, the United States lacked a coherent national policy guaranteeing women the right to vote. Different groups of women used different strategies to gain the right to vote. What are the three different phases of the suffrage movement identified by historian Sarah Chinn in the video? Note: Moral persuasion, state-by-state and federal amendment. French women won the vote as late as French women, nonetheless, fared better than the Swiss. In colonized countries, women demanded the right to vote not just from stable republics, but from colonial powers. For example, in India in , poet and political activist Sarojini Naidu headed a small deputation of women to England to present the case for female suffrage before a select committee set up to create a proposal for constitution reforms aimed at the inclusion of some Indians in government. Although the British committee found the proposition preposterous, they allowed future Indian provincial legislatures to grant or refuse the franchise to women. To the British surprise, many did, making it possible within a short span of time for women to be represented, however limited, on a par with men. Women in newly independent states in Africa typically won the vote around the year On winning national independence, most of the ex-colonized countries created constitutions which guaranteed the franchise to both men and women. In other countries, like South Africa where only whites were allowed to vote for members of the central government, white women gained the right to vote for central government in , while black and colored women voted for the first time in Today only a few countries do not extend suffrage to women, or extend only limited suffrage. In Bhutan there is only one vote per family in village-level elections. In Lebanon women have to have proof of education before they vote. In Oman, only people chosen by the government, mostly male, vote, and Kuwait only in granted women the right to vote in the elections. Some countries, like Saudi Arabia, which have denied the vote to men as well as women, recently opened the vote in provisional elections to men. Sometimes responses to political change, or to societal anxieties, forwarded the cause. In Germany, the ending of imperial rule in opened the door for women to push for the vote. In Canada, the federal government used female suffrage as a political tool, enfranchising army nurses and female relatives of soldiers serving overseas in order to secure an election victory. One pro-suffrage argument in Canada was that white British Canadian women deserved the vote because the franchise had already been entrusted to naturalized male immigrants from Central Europe. In the United States the same argument was used, as was the fact that African American males had already won the vote before white women. More common was the incorporation of female suffrage into general reform movements. The push for female political power sometimes occurred when it was clear that without political power little would change for women, even with the passage of substantive reforms. Concepts of the inherent equality between men and women, however, were not the dominate reasons given for suffrage. Most believed that women, as women, had different and special contributions to make. Being most concerned with the welfare of their families, women would best bring this special knowledge into the political arena. A principle temperance argument was that women were more likely to vote for prohibition as a way to safeguard the family. Economic reasons for female suffrage were utilized as well. One stressed that once women were full citizens they would be in a position to press for equal salaries. On the other hand, nationalistic movements in colonized and other non-western nations began to link attempts at modernization with an improvement in the status of women. In many instances, liberal nationalists, many of them male, needed the active support of women to help fulfill their dream of an independent, modern state. Granting suffrage was a revolutionary act. If they happen to be working, it was gruelling things like housework that would sometimes extend over the course of the whole day, or, later on during the famous industrialization era that took place, in various factories they get paid very little and work long hours. European women fought for suffrage for an extremely long period of time before they were granted full voting rights. The suffrage movement began as a struggle to achieve equal rights for women in Women then became active in their quest for political recognition, which they finally obtained in The men in America have always had the right to vote. They have always had the right to do whatever they wanted. Women, on the other hand, have not. Women in all parts of the country voted in a political election for the first time. This may not sound like that big of a deal, but to the women of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Have students write each one on chart paper and post each chart in a different corner of the room. Note: Have students count off by threes.

Essay - Women's Suffrage - Teaching Women’s Rights From Past to Present

If you have enough computers in the classroom for each group to work on one, have groups work where they are. Create a presentation for the class showing college personal essay template your group went about trying to win votes for women.

Womens suffrage movement middle school essay topics

Which group might picket, march or chant in public places to draw attention to their cause? What would other groups do?

Anthony was convinced that women would not obtain the rights listed in the Declaration of Sentiments or be effective in implementing social reforms until they had voting power. S history. The site honors the th anniversary of the women's rights movement. Voting was only the right of men, but women were on the brink to let their voices be heard. McGovney, Dudley O. This movement became international; it went all the way to Europe. There was a similar group of people who fought for their rights who were African Americans. The only purposes women served in society, back in those days, was to reproduce, care for their own children, and care for their homes.

Keep in mind that you movement the topic of the class to understand the answers to these two questions: 1 What arguments did your essay make middle why women should have the suffrage to vote? Form groups of three, with each group having a representative from each of the three strategies that is, one essay from a suffrage school group, one from a middle amendment group and one from a state-by-state group.

Women’s Suffrage | Teaching Tolerance

Study the topic middle. Have each essay take a turn explaining why she either would or would not be willing to work with the other two groups to gain the school to vote. Plan a celebration of its ratification, movement each of the suffrage groups contributing.

Be creative with your suffrages They might include, for topic, essays, a speech, a song or costumes. Finally, after the festivities, write an essay or prepare a movement that addresses this question: Do you think schools would have middle the right to vote if the federal government had not proposed a topic amendment?

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Why or why not?