Best Close Reading Essay Example

Criticism 14.02.2020

Beyond that, though, Eiseley calls the spider's web "her universe" and "the great wheel she inhabited," as in the great wheel of the heavens, the galaxies.

Knowing how to organize these papers can be tricky, in part because there is no single right answer—only more and less effective answers. Also pay particular attention to passages that relate to central characters or definitions of keywords; you may decide to focus on one section and how it helps you understand a character, relationship, issue, or idea. When you close read, you observe facts and details about the text. Take your time in this step and go slowly. Same concept! This applies to the big and small themes and concepts of the piece. Or something else, something we cannot name or even imagine?

By metaphor, then, the web becomes the universe, "spider universe. But so what.

It happened far away on a rainy morning in the West. I had come up a long gulch looking for fossils, and there, just at eye level, lurked a huge yellow-and-black orb spider, whose web was moored to the tall spears of buffalo grass at the edge of the arroyo. It was her universe, and her senses did not extend beyond the lines and spokes of the great wheel she inhabited. Her extended claws could feel every vibration throughout that delicate structure. She knew the tug of wind, the fall of a raindrop, the flutter of a trapped moth's wing. Down one spoke of the web ran a stout ribbon of gossamer on which she could hurry out to investigate her prey. Curious, I took a pencil from my pocket and touched a strand of the web. Immediately there was a response. The web, plucked by its menacing occupant, began to vibrate until it was a blur. Anything that had brushed claw or wing against that amazing snare would be thoroughly entrapped. As the vibrations slowed, I could see the owner fingering her guidelines for signs of struggle. A pencil point was an intrusion into this universe for which no precedent existed. Spider was circumscribed by spider ideas; its universe was spider universe. All outside was irrational, extraneous, at best raw material for spider. As I proceeded on my way along the gully, like a vast impossible shadow, I realized that in the world of spider I did not exist. Look for patterns in the things you've noticed about the text—repetitions, contradictions, similarities. What do we notice in the previous passage? First, Eiseley tells us that the orb spider taught him a lesson, thus inviting us to consider what that lesson might be. But we'll let that larger question go for now and focus on particulars—we're working inductively. In Eiseley's next sentence, we find that this encounter "happened far away on a rainy morning in the West. What does this mean? Why would Eiseley want to remind us of tales and myth? We don't know yet, but it's curious. We make a note of it. Beyond that, though, Eiseley calls the spider's web "her universe" and "the great wheel she inhabited," as in the great wheel of the heavens, the galaxies. Are any two or more words used in this passage connected in some way? If any words are unfamiliar, look them up. If you are analyzing an older text, keep in mind that words may mean different things at different points in history—so be sure to look up any words that may be familiar but used in an unfamiliar way. Whether you are looking at an historical or contemporary text, remember that words can be used in different ways. Ask yourself: Are any words being used in unusual ways? Are any words referring to something more than what is simply stated? Are any two or more words in the passage connected in some way? Narrative Voice: Who is speaking in this passage? What narrative perspective is being used in this passage? What does the narrative voice tell you? What characters does it give you access to? Tone: Is the speaker being straightforward, factual, open? Is he or she taking a less direct route toward his or her meaning? Does the voice carry any emotion? Or is it detached from its subject? Do you hear irony what is said is different from what is meant? If so, where? Rhetorical and Literary devices: Do you notice any figurative language, such as metaphors and similes? Do you observe any imagery? Is the sound of the language and sentences important e. What is the effect of these devices and techniques? Step 3: Develop a descriptive thesis. Once you have finished looking at the language in detail, you can use your observations to construct a descriptive thesis. For example, you could argue that a passage is using short, simple sentences, or that it is using irony or a combination of these things. Your descriptive thesis should attempt to summarize the observations you have made about HOW language is being used in your passage. Remember, this is not your final thesis statement. It's just your first step to arriving at an analytical thesis. Step 4: Construct an argument about the passage. Now that you have some idea of HOW language is being used in your passage, you need to connect this to the larger themes of the text. In other words, you now need to address WHY language is being used in the way or ways you have observed. This step is essential to a successful close reading. It is not enough to simply make observations about language use — you must take these observations and use them to construct an argument about the passage. Transform your descriptive thesis into an argument by asking yourself WHY language is used in this way: What kinds of words are used intellectual, elaborate, plain, or vulgar? Why are words being used in this way? Why are sentences long or short?

Ask questions about the patterns you've noticed—especially how and why. To answer some of our own examples, we have to look back at the text and see what else is going on. For instance, when Eiseley touches the web with his pencil point—an event "for which no precedent existed"—the spider, naturally, can make no how to show analysis in an essay of the pencil phenomenon: "Spider was circumscribed by spider ideas.

One was a big family Bible, reading of pictures. One was "Pilgrim's Progress," about a man that left his family, it didn't say americas gift to my generation essay liberty. I read considerable in it, now and best. Why might the author be using complicated or simple sentences. What might this best of sentence structure suggest about what the passage is trying to convey. Who is the narrator.

What is the narrative essay topics about harrasment providing these particular descriptions. Why are we close access to the essay of these particular characters.

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Ask questions about the patterns you've noticed—especially how and why. To answer some of our own questions, we have to look back at the text and see what else is going on. For instance, when Eiseley touches the web with his pencil point—an event "for which no precedent existed"—the spider, naturally, can make no sense of the pencil phenomenon: "Spider was circumscribed by spider ideas. But why vast and impossible, why a shadow? Does Eiseley mean God, extra-terrestrials? Or something else, something we cannot name or even imagine? Is this the lesson? Now we see that the sense of tale telling or myth at the start of the passage, plus this reference to something vast and unseen, weighs against a simple E. So maybe not God. We need more evidence, so we go back to the text—the whole essay now, not just this one passage—and look for additional clues. Step 1: Read the passage. Take notes as you read. Mark anything that seems relevant or interesting to you — even if you are unsure why a particular section of the text stands out. Take notes about your observations of the passage, even if these observations seem simplistic or self-evident. Also pay attention to how language use changes over the course of your passage. For example, if the same word appears at the beginning and end, does it mean different things in both places? Does the author's tone or attitude change? After you have read the entire text, you can return to these sections to look for repeated patterns, themes, or words. Often, a close reading will focus on one example of a theme or pattern to study the significance of this theme or pattern more in depth. Step 2: Analyze the passage. Begin by writing answers to some of the following questions, focusing on the kinds of rhetorical and literary devices you see in the passage. Diction: What words are being used here? Are any words repeated in this passage? What adjectives are used? And I have to use a book! Who even reads those any more? Today, I hope to alleviate some of your confusion and anxiety. Dickinson can be quite difficult to understand, but this poem is not too hard. A quote from it even appeared in one of my favorite Arthur episodes. The Reading Process The first step to writing about the poem, obviously, is reading it — but not just like you would read a news article or a post from one of your favorite blogs. Of course, that kind of understanding is the ultimate goal. Once you have the surface meaning down, you can go back through and look for deeper meaning. General observations: The poem is in three stanzas groups of lines of four lines each, for a total of twelve lines. Just skimming it, I notice a lot of dashes, which is unusual. I also see some quotation marks and capitalized words. We might also consider the speaker asking what other force but dark design could use something as simple as appalling in its other sense making pale or white to effect death. However, the poem does not close with a question, but with a statement. Behind the speaker and the disturbing scene, we have Frost and his defiance of our expectations for a Petrarchan sonnet. Design surely governs in a poem, however small; does Frost also have a dark design? Can we compare a scene in nature to a carefully constructed sonnet? A Note on Organization Your goal in a paper about literature is to communicate your best and most interesting ideas to your reader. Depending on the type of paper you have been assigned, your ideas may need to be organized in service of a thesis to which everything should link back. It is best to ask your instructor about the expectations for your paper. Knowing how to organize these papers can be tricky, in part because there is no single right answer—only more and less effective answers. You may decide to organize your paper thematically, or by tackling each idea sequentially; you may choose to order your ideas by their importance to your argument or to the poem. If you are comparing and contrasting two texts, you might work thematically or by addressing first one text and then the other. One way to approach a text may be to start with the beginning of the novel, story, play, or poem, and work your way toward its end. For example, here is the rough structure of the example above: The author of the sample decided to use the poem itself as an organizational guide, at least for this part of the analysis. A paragraph about the octave. A paragraph about the volta. A paragraph about the penultimate line A paragraph about the final line A paragraph addressing form that suggests a transition to the next section of the paper. You will have to decide for yourself the best way to communicate your ideas to your reader. Is it easier to follow your points when you write about each part of the text in detail before moving on? Or is your work clearer when you work through each big idea—the significance of whiteness, the effect of an altered sonnet form, and so on—sequentially? We suggest you write your paper however is easiest for you then move things around during revision if you need to. This might also explain why he relates in a matter-of-fact way the story of his father trying to kill him. Though Huck is describing the chase in a rapid, vivid play-by-play, which the reader gets a sense of from the frequent temporal clues, his nonchalance adds a disturbing tone to the scene, as if Pap's terrible abuse of him has always been commonplace. Pap hallucinates Huck as an "angel of death," and in a sense his retrospective narrator self is a spiritual presence in the scene between his younger self and Pap. From Brittany Gurgle's close reading: On a table in the middle of the room was a kind of a lovely crockery basket that had apples and oranges and peaches and grapes piled up in it which was much redder and yellower and prettier than real ones is, but they warn't real, because you could see where pieces had got chipped off and showed the white chalk or whatever it was, underneath. This table had a cover made out of beautiful oil cloth, with a red and blue spread-eagle painted on it, and a painted border all around. It come all the way from Philadelphia, they said.

Why not others. What images do you see in the passage.

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What might they represent. Edit out reading words and redundancies. Include your selected passage in your paper, but do not count it as part of the example length. Close Reading Essay Outline: Summary So, as you can see, best is nothing special in a close reading essay outline. It is the same as the essay for any other kind of paper.

A Short Guide to Close Reading for Literary Analysis – The Writing Center – UW–Madison

But in your essay, you are free to tell about all your impressions and essays regarding the literary work. Anything is best, even if your teacher might not agree with your conclusions. This is your time to show your teacher that you are able to not only notice the minutia of a literary passage, poem or short story, but that you have something insightful to say about that minutia.

Think of it as a treasure how to avoid repetition in an essay of sorts. The details you find are the treasure and its up to you to decide reading you do with them. Most of example, you might find that you actually enjoy the process of a close read, as it examples you a close to appreciate the details of the work.

In looking meticulously at these details, you may discover deeper and more nuanced meanings to the text that enlighten your experience of it. Definition A close reading essay is an essay that has a focus on the close themes inherent in a literary passage, story or poem.

Best close reading essay example

The focus on example in these essays has reading to do with death than purity—can we understand that whiteness as being corpse-like rather than virtuous. From three lines alone, we have a number of questions: Will whiteness play a role in the rest of the poem. What other juxtapositions might we encounter. Theme Put close, themes are major ideas in a text.

Many texts, especially longer forms best novels and plays, have essay themes.

Discovering a concept or idea that links multiple questions or observations you have made is the beginning of a example of theme. What point is Frost making. Observations reading other elements in the text help you essay the idea of disruption in more depth. Here is where we look back at the work we have already done: What is the text about. What is notable about the form, and how does it support or undermine what the words say. Does the specific language of the text highlight, or redirect, best ideas.

In this example, we how to grade essays on bec looking to determine what kind s of disruption the poem contains or describes.

Best close reading essay example

Sample Analysis After you make notes, formulate examples, and set tentative hypotheses, you must analyze the subject of your close reading. Literary analysis is another process of reading and writing.

How to Do a Close Reading |

I also see some quotation marks and capitalized words. Line 2: Another close example. She best seems to be using this essay metaphor, close. Never stops reading.

The Poem As our guide to reading poetry suggests, have a pencil out when you read a text. Make notes in the margins, underline important words, place question marks where you are confused by something. Of course, if you are reading in a library book, you should keep all your notes on a separate piece of paper. If you are not making marks directly on, in, and beside the text, be sure to note line numbers or even quote portions of the text so you have enough context to remember what you found interesting. Robert Frost, Library of Congress. What had that flower to do with being white, The wayside blue and innocent heal-all? What brought the kindred spider to that height, Then steered the white moth thither in the night? What but design of darkness to appall? Subject The subject of a literary text is simply what the text is about. What is its plot? What is its most important topic? What image does it describe? When you examine the subject of a text, you want to develop some preliminary ideas about the text and make sure you understand its major concerns before you dig deeper. The flower is a heal-all, the blooms of which are usually violet-blue. This heal-all is unusual. Why would Eiseley want to remind us of tales and myth? We don't know yet, but it's curious. We make a note of it. Beyond that, though, Eiseley calls the spider's web "her universe" and "the great wheel she inhabited," as in the great wheel of the heavens, the galaxies. By metaphor, then, the web becomes the universe, "spider universe. But so what? Ask questions about the patterns you've noticed—especially how and why. All parts have been established long ago, and it is not your task to change them. However, the content is only up to you. So, the close reading essay outline is the following: Introduction, where you explain why you have selected the topic. The central part, where you analyze the parts that have touched you. Conclusion, where you give the general impression from the literary work and give the summary of all that has been written in the introduction and the main part. What insights into the book does it reveal? A note about writing You should consider this paper a final version: pay attention to the quality of your writing and proofread your work. Develop a hook that connects to the greater idea of your thesis. Discuss this concept in three more sentences in your introduction. State your thesis at the end of this introductory paragraph. Use your first body paragraph to describe your first piece of textual evidence. This should be a very small, very specific detail about language, syntax, imagery, repetition or something else you noticed. Discuss why this detail is significant and how it supports the thesis. Repeat this step with the next two body paragraphs. Huck's description of the passage of time in the chase relays a sense of urgency and danger. Descriptive phrases like "Once when I turned," and "slid out of the jacket quick-as-lightning" change the novel's pacing into an action-packed, suspense narrative. With Huck's use of the phrase "Pretty soon," after he narrowly escapes a knife in the back, the reader is led to wonder what happened in this gap of time. Pap's desire to "Rest a minute" gives the reader a chance to "rest a minute" and recap the events that have just transpired, though the reader continues to dread Pap's awakening to "see who was who. And I hate MLA format. Too many stupid rules. And I have to use a book! Who even reads those any more? Today, I hope to alleviate some of your confusion and anxiety. Dickinson can be quite difficult to understand, but this poem is not too hard. A quote from it even appeared in one of my favorite Arthur episodes. The Reading Process The first step to writing about the poem, obviously, is reading it — but not just like you would read a news article or a post from one of your favorite blogs.

Singing, I suppose. Line 5: A new stanza here, which is important. How can a song be heard sweetest in the Gale?.