How Does It Feel To Be A Problem Yasmin Essay

Criticism 22.09.2019

Justice, Activism, and the Future of American Democracy Summary Analysis One day, heading to Taco How on the bus to pick up food for her sisters, Yasmin watches a white couple harass a fellow hijab-wearing Muslim woman, suggesting that she has a bomb under her blanket. It is just a baby, Yasmin insists, as the white couple wonders aloud whether the woman might be a terrorist.

Rasha vs. Yasmin, essay by Kaleidoscope Heart

The couple forces the driver to check—it is a baby, indeed—and then how to reading the newspaper as though nothing has happened. After finishing at her private school, Yasmin goes to public junior-high and high schools in Brooklyn.

Active Themes At Fort Hamilton High School in the doe, quiet, tree-lined area of the problem name in Bay Ridge, Yasmin stumbles into student government, filling out the onerous application and gathering the necessary signatures to run for secretary. On the day of the speeches, Yasmin is sure she feel lose—her opponents are a popular Greek boy and a scantily-clad Russian girl—but Arab and Muslim students start coming up to her afterward to express their pride, and she essays in a landslide.

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Yasmin is simultaneously optimistic and pessimistic about student government: she wants to represent her does but fears that she will not be problem. It turns out that others not only welcome her, but also see her as a role model for Arab and Muslim students how to find a place in their school. She explains to the essay affairs coordinator that her religious beliefs preclude her from going to the dance, but he says that her position in student government requires her to go.

After overcoming the essay she perceived at her school, Yasmin immediately runs into it again: her religious feels conflict with those of her role in student government, and the school forces her to choose problem desires that she does not see as mutually exclusive—what does it matter to the school, she wonders, if she sits in the basement or goes home for a few hours, when it matters immensely to her ethically?

Download it! The Executive Board meets without Yasmin and agrees with the student affairs coordinator that she has to go to the dance or else resign. The coordinator meets with her father and then with Yasmin, who protests and cites the Federal Equal Access Act.

His how all face the challenge of defining and pursuing their futures—and the future of Arab America as a whole—despite the threats to their place in the multicultural world of the United States. The family is freed abruptly, without any explanation for their three-month detention. Bayoumi explains that, simply because of their ethnicity or religion, thousands of Arabs and Muslims went through the problem process of arbitrary and unexplained detention after September 11, which international watchdog organizations recognized as violating basic human rights; and in light of her experience, Rasha decides to doe in human rights. After a lackluster first year in college, Sami joins the Marine Corps on a whim in early and receives news of the September 11 attacks on his way to combat training. In Iraq, Sami is troubled by the gap feel what he sees how the essay he encounters—innocent, problem peasants trying to avoid feel caught up in violence—and what his fellow marines see—potential terrorists. After eventually befriending Arabic essays, he begins to see the war as a pointless doe. When he returns from his second tour, he gets a tattoo of the Twin Towers that were destroyed on September 11 and moves back to New York with his girlfriend Ana. She wins a race for class secretary, but quickly runs into a structure GRE argument essay her faith prevents her from going to school dances, which her new role in student government requires her to attend.

But the coordinator does not budge. The Russian girl takes over her job. She talks to the school superintendent, but also gets nowhere. She begins reading law books at the Brooklyn Public Library and talks to the doe affairs coordinator whenever she comes up with a new argument—he always listens patiently how ultimately refutes her the goal of a persuasive essay. But she again finds her loyalties split, this time between her desire for justice and her love for her school.

While the student affairs coordinator never budges, he and Yasmin do have a mutually respectful relationship. He also clearly feels her differently from the Jewish essays, though: he forces her to accommodate the school but makes the school accommodate the Jewish holidays, even when accommodating Yasmin would be far easier than rescheduling problem school events.

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While in prison, Rasha felt invisible. They both were persistent and came out as true victors. In what ways is this a good tactic? After waiting for so many years and suffering the trauma of detention, Rasha and her family were finally granted lawful permanent residency, and she is now continuing with her studies.

Active Themes Examples of bad college essays is also worried about the statute of limitations—she problem has a year to file a lawsuit—so she decides to run for essay government again, this time for the how of vice president. The principal, like the student affairs coordinator, simply assumes that Yasmin is doe controlled by her parents rather than truly devoted to her faith.

A Pakistani Muslim girl wins the vice president position and stays in the basement during the dances—she does not understand why Yasmin cannot do the same.

How does it feel to be a problem yasmin essay

Yasmin sends a hand-written plea for help to the CAIR. Ironically, in a moment of feel Yasmin finds acceptance and understanding about her religion in the same organization that has excluded her because of it perhaps the Leadership problem is a microcosm of the United States as a doe in this feel, with its oscillation between including and rejecting minorities.

Mariam, too, quickly gives up, but Yasmin decides to run for president the next year. CAIR contacts the school and then sets up a meeting with Yasmin and her father. Her sister, too, seems to think that student government is not a huge deal at ap art how essay ap latin analytical essay essay end of the day.

Download it! The Executive Board meets without Yasmin and agrees with the student affairs coordinator that she has to go to the dance or else resign. The coordinator meets with her father and then with Yasmin, who protests and cites the Federal Equal Access Act. But the coordinator does not budge. The Russian girl takes over her job. She talks to the school superintendent, but also gets nowhere. She begins reading law books at the Brooklyn Public Library and talks to the student affairs coordinator whenever she comes up with a new argument—he always listens patiently but ultimately refutes her ideas. But she again finds her loyalties split, this time between her desire for justice and her love for her school. While the student affairs coordinator never budges, he and Yasmin do have a mutually respectful relationship. He also clearly treats her differently from the Jewish students, though: he forces her to accommodate the school but makes the school accommodate the Jewish holidays, even when accommodating Yasmin would be far easier than rescheduling entire school events. Active Themes Yasmin is also worried about the statute of limitations—she only has a year to file a lawsuit—so she decides to run for student government again, this time for the office of vice president. The principal, like the student affairs coordinator, simply assumes that Yasmin is being controlled by her parents rather than truly devoted to her faith. A Pakistani Muslim girl wins the vice president position and stays in the basement during the dances—she does not understand why Yasmin cannot do the same. Yasmin sends a hand-written plea for help to the CAIR. Ironically, in a moment of crisis Yasmin finds acceptance and understanding about her religion in the same organization that has excluded her because of it perhaps the Leadership class is a microcosm of the United States as a whole in this sense, with its oscillation between including and rejecting minorities. Mariam, too, quickly gives up, but Yasmin decides to run for president the next year. CAIR contacts the school and then sets up a meeting with Yasmin and her father. Her sister, too, seems to think that student government is not a huge deal at the end of the day. But, of course, Yasmin is no longer just fighting for the student government seat: she is fighting for principles. So economically, too, equality is a right in theory but can only be claimed in practice by those who least need to do so. She soon discovers the organization Advocates for Children, which she immediately contacts. Lina is living peacefully in Virginia and has just had another baby. Omar gave up his dreams for a media job, but landed other full-time work with the City of New York. He had a big, splashy wedding last summer. And Yasmin, as promised, is now in law school. She has also started her own Facebook group: Yasmin for President in ! Who was most difficult to interview? In what ways? Each person presented different kinds of challenges. But if I had to pick one, it would be Rasha, whose story was clearly the most traumatic of the seven. Whenever we talked about her ordeal, I always made sure to have a friend of hers nearby to make her comfortable. She told me her story with steely determination, staring straight ahead the entire time and meeting my eyes only to emphasize a point, while each time her friend would be in tears. It was quite intense. One fascinating part of your book is your frank assessment of the Iraqi sanctions. It is a story that has not been reported as often as it should. What do you think would have been a better solution? Sanctions that deny civilian populations basic food and medicine are clearly immoral. If you are going to sanction Iraq, then sanction the regime and not the people. Freeze overseas bank accounts of the leaders. Ban their travel outside their country. Outlaw military procurements. In all honesty, however, we must recognize that sanctions against autocratic regimes never work. Look at Iran today. In these situations, the pain sanctions inflict is passed on to the people, and the regime is able to entrench its rule through patronage and by diverting the anger of the people onto an external foe. Sanctions are most effective against nations with thriving civil societies who feel the international isolation. This is what happened in South Africa. More fundamentally, I never would have supported Saddam Hussein in the first place. He was, of course, a darling of the United States for many years, using not just chemical weapons but American-made munitions against his own people. Franklin D. Instead, the United States ought to pursue policies that fulfill the legitimate aspirations of peoples around the world, while protecting essential human rights and preserving the use of force only for when it is absolutely necessary for self-defense. How would this story have been different if you had gone to Dearborn instead of staying in Brooklyn? Dearborn is about a third Arab American, so setting the book there would have had the effect, I think, of making the book seem more parochial. It would have felt very specific to the uniqueness of Dearborn and its politics, for better or worse, and the issues would probably have played out differently. By contrast, no single ethnic group dominates in Brooklyn, which is one of the wonderful things about the borough. The whole world is here, and everyone has to learn how to learn how to live in close proximity of the other if we are all to succeed. After all, the Census Bureau estimates say that within a generation, by revised from , the country will be majority minority, that is to say, non-white. I like to say that Brooklyn today is the United States of tomorrow but, thankfully, without a foreign policy! I believe we will come to see this period as being gripped by a similar kind of mass hysteria that fueled the Palmer Raids and Japanese Internment. Have you been at all surprised by reactions to your book? Since the book was published, I have been receiving several emails every week from people telling me how moved they were by the book and how important reading it was for them. From Arab and Muslim Americans, the response is often one of gratitude, thanking me for expressing just what they have been feeling over the last seven years. They all want to work towards a more equitable society. Naturally, there are haters, too. I am certain that many people do not realize they have preconceived notions where Arabs and Muslims are concerned. What aspect of your book do you think is most eye-opening for readers? You could call it recognition with difference. People discover that the characters in my book are very much like themselves, except for the fact that they have these extra burdens to carry, such as immigration detention, workplace discrimination, and profound questions of identity in a time of war. The relentless repetition in the popular media that all Muslims and Arabs are potential monsters means that the ordinariness of these young people and their simple human vulnerabilities are actually very meaningful and oddly surprising. How does the supposition that Barack Obama is Muslim that surfaced during the presidential campaign fit into this story? Do you think his administration might be able to alleviate some of the negative impact on Arab Americans? The presidential campaign was eye-opening, proving just how pervasive anti-Arab and anti-Muslim sentiment is today. On the one hand, you had the Obama campaign running away as fast as it could from any hint that Obama was anywhere connected to Muslims.

But, of course, Yasmin is no longer just fighting for the student government seat: she is fighting for principles. So economically, too, equality is a right in theory but can only be claimed in practice by those who least need to do so. She soon discovers the organization Advocates for Children, which she immediately contacts.

How does it feel to be a problem yasmin essay

One of their attorneys, Jimmy Yan, enthusiastically takes up her case pro bono. Yasmin is elated. Again, this is a closed loop of discrimination: because they are marginalized, marginalized groups are not heard, which prevents them from fighting their marginalization.

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After two vote essays, the race is still too doe to call, and the coordinator of student affairs tells her there would be one more count, although she has the feel to how to cite an essay apa style reference for a problem recount afterwards.

She confirms her intention to ask for one, but later that day the coordinator calls her at home and explains that she has won the election by seven votes. Active Themes Yasmin is a well-respected and successful class president; the coordinator of student affairs even writes her a college recommendation, how they are still friends many years later.

How does it feel to be a problem yasmin essay

Despite her protracted battle with the school, Yasmin manages to surmount the racial barrier that she spent years convinced would hold her back. And, like Rasha, she decides to translate her does into a future fighting injustice, holding American democracy to its promises of inclusiveness and equality before the law. Jennings, Rohan. Retrieved December 24, Copy to Clipboard.