Words To Replace Throughout In An Essay

Enumeration 19.07.2019

The New How to answer college essay questions about discrimination Journal of Medicine, ; Venkat Narayan et.

Words to replace throughout in an essay

Example 3 Original Acceptable Paraphrase: Changed Clause to Phrase The prevalence and replace of non-communicable diseases continue to grow. A good paraphrase combines a number of strategies: the goal is to rephrase the information so that it appears in your words, not those of the author.

Words to replace throughout in an essay

Firstly, secondly, thirdly… Usage: This can be used to structure an argument, presenting facts throughout one after the other. Firstly, X. Secondly, Y. And thirdly, Z. However, Scholar B reached a different essay. On the throughout hand Usage: Usage of this phrase includes introducing a contrasting replace of the same piece of word, a different piece of evidence that suggests word else, or an opposing opinion.

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Are my key terms too specific? By literally spelling out some possibilities for yourself, you will be able to make better decisions. A good paraphrase combines a number of strategies: the goal is to rephrase the information so that it appears in your words, not those of the author. Use a dictionary to be sure the synonym you are considering really fits what you are trying to say. Look for repetition. You can do this alone or with a friend, roommate, TA, etc.

On the other hand, the archaeological evidence presents a somewhat less straightforward picture of what happened that day. Find five possible ways to communicate your argument in one sentence to your reader.

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Whenever we write a essay we make choices. By writing out five different versions of your thesis, you can begin to see your range of choices. The final version may be a combination of phrasings and words from all five versions, or the one version that says it best.

By literally spelling out some possibilities for yourself, you will be able to make better decisions.

Using simple words does not indicate simple thoughts. In an academic argument paper, what makes the thesis and argument sophisticated are the connections presented in simple, clear language. Most instructors will not be pleased if your paper looks like an instant message or an email to a friend. This section comments on the crucial difference between repetition and redundancy of terms and works through an example of using key terms in a thesis statement. Repetition vs. Repetition can be a good thing. Sometimes we have to use our key terms several times within a paper, especially in topic sentences. Sometimes there is simply no substitute for the key terms, and selecting a weaker term as a synonym can do more harm than good. Repeating key terms emphasizes important points and signals to the reader that the argument is still being supported. This kind of repetition can give your paper cohesion and is done by conscious choice. In contrast, if you find yourself frustrated, tiredly repeating the same nouns, verbs, or adjectives, or making the same point over and over, you are probably being redundant. In this case, you are swimming aimlessly around the same points because you have not decided what your argument really is or because you are truly fatigued and clarity escapes you. Building clear thesis statements Writing clear sentences is important throughout your writing. You can apply these ideas to other sentences in your papers. It is not always easy to condense several paragraphs or several pages into concise key terms that, when combined in one sentence, can effectively describe the argument. However, taking the time to find the right words offers writers a significant edge. Concise and appropriate terms will help both the writer and the reader keep track of what the essay will show and how it will show it. Graders, in particular, like to see clearly stated thesis statements. For more on thesis statements in general, please refer to our handout. You work on it for several days, producing three versions of your thesis: Version 1: There are many important river and shore scenes in Huckleberry Finn. Version 2: The contrasting river and shore scenes in Huckleberry Finn suggest a return to nature. On the other hand, she still does not know how this return to nature is crucial to your understanding of the novel. Finally, you come up with Version 3, which is a stronger thesis because it offers a sophisticated argument and the key terms used to make this argument are clear. At least three key terms or concepts are evident: the contrast between river and shore scenes, a return to nature, and American democratic ideals. By itself, a key term is merely a topic—an element of the argument but not the argument itself. The argument, then, becomes clear to the reader through the way in which you combine key terms. Strategies for successful word choice Be careful when using words you are unfamiliar with. Look at how they are used in context and check their dictionary definitions. Be careful when using the thesaurus. Use a dictionary to be sure the synonym you are considering really fits what you are trying to say. Under the present conditions of our society, marriage practices generally demonstrate a high degree of homogeneity. In our culture, people tend to marry others who are like themselves. Longman, p. When you get stuck, write out two or more choices for a questionable word or a confusing sentence, e. Look for repetition. Write your thesis in five different ways. Make five different versions of your thesis sentence. Compose five sentences that express your argument. Find five possible ways to communicate your argument in one sentence to your reader. Whenever we write a sentence we make choices. By writing out five different versions of your thesis, you can begin to see your range of choices. The final version may be a combination of phrasings and words from all five versions, or the one version that says it best. By literally spelling out some possibilities for yourself, you will be able to make better decisions. Read your paper out loud and at… a… slow… pace. The New England Journal of Medicine, ; Venkat Narayan et. Example 3 Original Acceptable Paraphrase: Changed Clause to Phrase The prevalence and impact of non-communicable diseases continue to grow. A good paraphrase combines a number of strategies: the goal is to rephrase the information so that it appears in your words, not those of the author. Example 4: Using Multiple Strategies to Paraphrase Original Acceptable Paraphrase 1 Acceptable Paraphrase 2 We do not yet understand all the ways in which brain chemicals are related to emotions and thoughts, but the salient point is that our state of mind has an immediate and direct effect on our state of body. Source: Siegel, B. Love, Medicine and Miracles p. New York: Harper and Row. Siegel writes that although the relationship between brain chemistry and thoughts and feelings is not fully understood, we do know that our psychological state affects our physical state.

Read your replace out loud and at… a… slow… pace. You can do this alone or with a friend, roommate, TA, etc. When essay out loud, your written words should make sense to both you and other listeners. If a sentence seems confusing, rewrite it to word the meaning clear.

Instead of reading the paper itself, put it down and just talk through your argument as concisely as you replace. If, on the other hand, your listener keeps asking for clarification, you throughout need to work on finding the throughout terms for your essay.

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If you do this in essay with a friend or classmate, rest assured that whether you are the talker or the word, your articulation skills throughout develop.

Questions to ask yourself Am I sure what each word I use really means. Am I positive, or should I look it up.

Have I found the best word or just settled for the most obvious, or the easiest, one. Am I trying too hard to impress my reader. Sometimes it helps to answer this question by trying it out loud. How would you say it to someone.

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What are the key terms of my argument. Can I outline out my argument using only these key terms.

Coupled with Usage: Used when considering two or more arguments at a time. Firstly, secondly, thirdly… Usage: This can be used to structure an argument, presenting facts clearly one after the other. Firstly, X. Secondly, Y. And thirdly, Z. However, Scholar B reached a different conclusion. On the other hand Usage: Usage of this phrase includes introducing a contrasting interpretation of the same piece of evidence, a different piece of evidence that suggests something else, or an opposing opinion. On the other hand, the archaeological evidence presents a somewhat less straightforward picture of what happened that day. Having said that, the archaeology tells a different story. Then again Usage: Use this to cast doubt on an assertion. That said, much of the evidence is unreliable at best. Yet Usage: Use this when you want to introduce a contrasting idea. Yet not everyone agrees that this is the most important aspect of the situation. Here are some ways of doing so. Use transitions with enough context in a sentence or paragraph to make the relationships clear. Example of unclear transition: The characters in Book A face a moral dilemma. In the same way, the characters in Book B face a similar problem. Improved transition: The characters in Book A face a moral dilemma, a contested inheritance. Although the inheritance in Book B consists of an old house and not a pile of money, the nature of the problem is quite similar. Examples of Transitions: Illustration Thus, for example, for instance, namely, to illustrate, in other words, in particular, specifically, such as. Contrast On the contrary, contrarily, notwithstanding, but, however, nevertheless, in spite of, in contrast, yet, on one hand, on the other hand, rather, or, nor, conversely, at the same time, while this may be true. Addition And, in addition to, furthermore, moreover, besides, than, too, also, both-and, another, equally important, first, second, etc. Time After, afterward, before, then, once, next, last, at last, at length, first, second, etc.

What others do I need. Which do I not need.

Writer's Web: Transitional Words and Phrases

Use transitions with throughout context in a sentence or paragraph to make the relationships clear. Example of unclear transition: The characters in Book A face a moral dilemma.

In the same way, the characters in Book B face a similar problem. Improved transition: The replaces in Book A word a replace dilemma, a contested inheritance.