Writing Intensive Class Essays

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Students are better able to get to know their professor and classmates, and receive more individual instruction. Writing courses are almost always taught by faculty rather than graduate students, giving students yet another opportunity to get to know faculty as undergraduates.

In writing-intensive courses, students may have in-class writing assignments, but the bulk of the grade generally depends on writing several short, or a few longer, academic papers. These may be reflections on required readings, critical inquiry into questions raised by the course material, or individualized research papers. In essay classes, students should expect to give and receive peer critiques of their work, and to turn in one or intensive revisions of the original paper.

These may include essay and short answer exam questions, research papers, essays, reviews, letters, memos, evaluation reports, critiques, case studies, lab reports, class bibliographies, and other discipline-specific writings. Evaluation The focus of evaluation of writing in a discipline should be on clarity, completeness, and organization.

WR course instructors need not feel responsible for teaching the more technical writings of writing. However, instructors may refuse to accept papers with numerous grammatical and mechanical errors and encourage students to edit and resubmit the work. Informal Writing It is writing for oneself. When grading such assignments, I tend to point out a limited number of errors related to writing style and move on. Also for the sake of time, I only write a few comments on these essays because generally the how to put a stanza in an essay are about the same for each student.

I again emphasize that if they have more specific questions or would like more detailed feedback to please talk with me. Usually just a few students are interested in conversations where we really get to discuss how to improve as a writer.

This is especially useful when students must handle multiple texts. Maximum 20 students. Students are challenged by the many kinds of assignments. Research indicates that shorter formal assignments help students more than simply assigning one long paper. The student chooses how to handle revision for the fourth paper. Students need to develop confidence in their arguments and how to develop an argument. For the final, students also write one cumulative essay, for which they also get the question in advance. I usually write all over the papers.

Such out-of-class assignments open the door for plagiarism; however, plagiarism can be virtually eliminated by regularly changing writing assignments, having unusual writing assignments, regularly offering to clarify any questions and to review papers in office hours before the due date there will always be surprisingly few who take such opportunityand by audience vietnam war essay students sign and submit a detailed academic honesty pledge with each assignment.

In my experience, Turnitin is not helpful in preventing plagiarism but only in catching it. I love writing and tell students what is justice essay writing is essential to learning. Students essay generally complain about writing, regardless of the amount, and beg for intensive assignments until they see they CAN write and CAN learn class effectively with writing intensive assignments.

I explain writing gives students room to be flexible, creative, and truly show their learning. With written assignments, students have an opportunity to do better and their knowledge is focused on meaningful, writing information. In my upper level course, we discuss an excellent paragraph written by a intensive scholar and a chapter that I have written.

We discuss how to think about the topic and likely approaches to the essay. Usually the discussion class writing is not at the sentence-level but about organization and argument. Sometimes we brainstorm and create charts on the board. This is especially useful when students must handle multiple texts. I discuss sentences, especially how to subordinate lesser ideas to more important writings.

I want students to think about the relationship between sentences and the logic of their argument. We discuss expectations for assignments and likely strategies for approaching the argument. We intensive look at successful essays. We discuss how to develop an writing and possible evidence to use.

Writing intensive class essays

Before the first assignment, I devote one intensive to writing. I distribute a handout with criteria for writing, ask students to describe their writing essays, and distribute a sample of a writing class, one containing a clear thesis and an argument.

Writing tutor suggestions for in-class discussion An in-class exercise, in pairs: to see the large picture, outline the draft— the thesis and staar persuasive essay lessons sentences. If these make sense, then move on to intensive logical transitions.

Their biggest problem is not thinking enough about the question before beginning to write. They also need to get feedback on their class full draft and then revise, especially the organization.

Basic Essay Writing Intensive | Smore Newsletters

Students need to start early to include these steps. Students have trouble carrying an argument from the writing to the end. Upper intensive students struggle with managing big essays and locating and using sources class.

The same core goal of these quizzes could be achieved through the use of blogs, discussion boards, journals, or reading logs, for example. So I started occasionally giving quizzes that absolutely required some knowledge of the assigned reading. Major exams and essays also provide useful opportunities for students to practice writing. My students probably get the most direct and personal feedback with their midterm exam. Students receive a list of five possible questions for both the midterm and final on the first day of class, and I encourage them to start studying early and to practice responses. I offer to review any practice responses, as well. On the day of each exam, I select two of the five and students answer both. For the final, students also write one cumulative essay, for which they also get the question in advance. These questions ask students to synthesize, evaluate, and organization information in order to formulate an opinion about the topics. Write an essay that traces the most important events and themes since and that describes what you have learned this semester. Since students get questions before hand, these exams not only assess learning but give students an opportunity to truly explore material. I will spend minutes reading and grading each one. I have found very detailed comments on essay exams are particularly important because students come to college with little practice at taking such exams. I am also a big fan of assigning out-of-class writing assignments. We will spend time during class well before the assignment going over how to write effectively. When grading such assignments, I tend to point out a limited number of errors related to writing style and move on. Also for the sake of time, I only write a few comments on these essays because generally the comments are about the same for each student. I again emphasize that if they have more specific questions or would like more detailed feedback to please talk with me. Students will learn to effectively compose a basic five paragraph essay and then enhance the fundamental structure with advanced techniques. Information specific to the ACT essay test and other timed essay tests will be included. Quality in-depth feedback will be provided on two essays so that students will learn from their errors and improve their writing. Students will also learn how to self-evaluate their writing. The cost includes 4 hours of instruction and in-depth evaluation of two essays. Also included in class fee is one email evaluation of one typed essay of up to words within one year of class date. Q - Can public school students attend? A - YES! Q - Who should take this class? A - The class is suggested for all 9th graders and for any older student who does not know the basics of essay writing or any student planning to take the SAT or ACT Plus Writing. If you are unsure if this class is a good fit, contact me at lisaquing gmail. What is your vision for the completed paper? Refine the thinking. Why is it important? How does your evidence support it? Why did you pick this thesis? Why did you organize your thinking in this way? On what grounds would someone oppose your position? What are likely counterarguments? It makes papers be more thoughtful and interesting, for the writer and for readers. Be straightforward and clear. Get to the core of their argument. Ask the student to explain the topic for each paragraph; then look at the opening and closing sentences and the evidence in the paragraph. Do they work together as a whole? Encourage re-thinking of the organization. Would another organization deepen the analysis? The student chooses how to handle revision for the fourth paper. All revisions occur before the final draft is submitted; no revisions take place after grading. I read two drafts of Paper One. I find that peer review is more helpful to the readers, not the writers; it helps students see their own writing in new ways. Students rewrite two of the first three papers after meeting with me. The focus of revision is re-thinking the argument, not on correcting. Often the content is muddled, and the student needs to reorganize. Because students have a new assignment almost every week, I emphasize applying what is learned from one assignment to the following assignment rather than emphasize rewriting of a graded assignment. Students have the option to revise if they wish. I do not mark specific mistakes; I read the draft and describe the significant problems to the student. If students choose to revise, certain limitations apply: they must meet with me; they must incorporate all of my feedback, and they must revise right away. It is important that students understand that the revision must be substantially better to quality for a change of grade. The key goal in revision is to get the student to re-think the central question of the assignment. I require revision and expansion of an in-class essay. Students are given the topic ahead; they may bring a page of quotations to use, and they write an essay in class. I comment on the essay, and the student then revises it into a formal paper, expanding the initial argument. Advantages to this design are that students pay close attention to my comments; I can direct the argument at an early stage; and the time pressure of in-class writing forces students to use their natural voice. Rubrics make for better papers. Students know what to focus on when writing, and I know what to focus on when grading. When I evaluate a paper, I emphasize one or two significant problems: what the student most needs to work on to write a better next draft or paper. I have students attach a cover sheet with answers to the following questions: What were you asked to work on in your previous paper, and how did you address these problems in the current paper? For introductory courses, I spend a lot of time on thesis sentences. Students e-mail me their proposed thesis sentences, and we discuss them in class. In intro. I distribute a stronger and a weaker paper from the class set, and we discuss them in depth. I devote two or three classes a semester to writing, specifically on how to develop a topic. Early in the semester, we discuss two professional journal articles. One is my favorite example of a bad paper, and the other is a very good paper. We discuss the differences, and the class sees what makes a good piece of writing. We spend time discussing the topic—how to narrow it down to a workable question. Most of our class discussion on writing involves organization. Early in the semester, we discuss likely organizational patterns for an assignment. I have students write down everything important they can think of about a topic; sometime I have them go to their notes and add other ideas. Then I put ideas on the board, and we discuss where are the best places to put ideas. I distribute a well-written introduction that includes a preview of the organization of the argument and an effective thesis sentence. We also look at a poorly written body paragraph lacking focus and support. In my upper level course, we discuss an excellent paragraph written by a professional scholar and a chapter that I have written. We discuss how to think about the topic and likely approaches to the organization. Usually the discussion about writing is not at the sentence-level but about organization and argument. Sometimes we brainstorm and create charts on the board. This is especially useful when students must handle multiple texts. I discuss sentences, especially how to subordinate lesser ideas to more important ideas. I want students to think about the relationship between sentences and the logic of their argument. We discuss expectations for assignments and likely strategies for approaching the argument. We also look at successful models. We discuss how to develop an argument and possible evidence to use. Before the first assignment, I devote one class to writing. I distribute a handout with criteria for writing, ask students to describe their writing problems, and distribute a sample of a good paper, one containing a clear thesis and an argument. Writing tutor suggestions for in-class discussion An in-class exercise, in pairs: to see the large picture, outline the draft— the thesis and topic sentences. If these make sense, then move on to developing logical transitions. Their biggest problem is not thinking enough about the question before beginning to write. They also need to get feedback on their first full draft and then revise, especially the organization. Students need to start early to include these steps. Students have trouble carrying an argument from the beginning to the end. Upper level students struggle with managing big questions and locating and using sources effectively. Students need to stay focused on the question.

Students need to stay focused on the question. They do not carry their thesis through the entire argument. Each essay must relate back to the thesis in intensive way. Students also need to learn how to develop an argument and use sources more fully. Students essay to work on how to examine counterarguments, how to intensive structure the argument, and how to preview in the introduction the organization of the argument.

Students need to develop writing in their arguments and how to develop an writing. In addition, they class do not spend enough time on their writing, which contributes to underdeveloped arguments.

Writing intensive class essays

I assign two eight-page papers, a midterm, and a final. There class are additional essay assignments to maintain some dialogue on the readings.

Related to this point: Writers often arrive at an important insight at the end of an early draft. They should bring the insight back to the introduction and write a new final paragraph that concludes the fuller, more insightful argument. Students like the tutorial process very much; they get responses from me and from group members. The highest paper grades are on these papers. Students tend to be more helpful on content—how to develop ideas. For introductory courses, I require one early draft meeting with me and am available for other meetings. I hold individual conferences and provide models of successful and unsuccessful papers. With upper level students, I spend considerable time in individual conferences discussing ideas. I often hold pre-writing conferences; I have found that meeting with two or three students at a time to discuss topics is quite effective. For a draft, discussion of ideas is paramount. The ideas drive the structure. What is your vision for the completed paper? Refine the thinking. Why is it important? How does your evidence support it? Why did you pick this thesis? Why did you organize your thinking in this way? On what grounds would someone oppose your position? What are likely counterarguments? It makes papers be more thoughtful and interesting, for the writer and for readers. Be straightforward and clear. Get to the core of their argument. Ask the student to explain the topic for each paragraph; then look at the opening and closing sentences and the evidence in the paragraph. Do they work together as a whole? Encourage re-thinking of the organization. Would another organization deepen the analysis? The student chooses how to handle revision for the fourth paper. All revisions occur before the final draft is submitted; no revisions take place after grading. I read two drafts of Paper One. I find that peer review is more helpful to the readers, not the writers; it helps students see their own writing in new ways. Students rewrite two of the first three papers after meeting with me. The focus of revision is re-thinking the argument, not on correcting. Often the content is muddled, and the student needs to reorganize. Because students have a new assignment almost every week, I emphasize applying what is learned from one assignment to the following assignment rather than emphasize rewriting of a graded assignment. Students have the option to revise if they wish. I do not mark specific mistakes; I read the draft and describe the significant problems to the student. If students choose to revise, certain limitations apply: they must meet with me; they must incorporate all of my feedback, and they must revise right away. It is important that students understand that the revision must be substantially better to quality for a change of grade. The key goal in revision is to get the student to re-think the central question of the assignment. I require revision and expansion of an in-class essay. Students are given the topic ahead; they may bring a page of quotations to use, and they write an essay in class. I comment on the essay, and the student then revises it into a formal paper, expanding the initial argument. Advantages to this design are that students pay close attention to my comments; I can direct the argument at an early stage; and the time pressure of in-class writing forces students to use their natural voice. Rubrics make for better papers. Students know what to focus on when writing, and I know what to focus on when grading. When I evaluate a paper, I emphasize one or two significant problems: what the student most needs to work on to write a better next draft or paper. I have students attach a cover sheet with answers to the following questions: What were you asked to work on in your previous paper, and how did you address these problems in the current paper? For introductory courses, I spend a lot of time on thesis sentences. Students e-mail me their proposed thesis sentences, and we discuss them in class. In intro. I distribute a stronger and a weaker paper from the class set, and we discuss them in depth. I devote two or three classes a semester to writing, specifically on how to develop a topic. Early in the semester, we discuss two professional journal articles. One is my favorite example of a bad paper, and the other is a very good paper. We discuss the differences, and the class sees what makes a good piece of writing. We spend time discussing the topic—how to narrow it down to a workable question. Most of our class discussion on writing involves organization. Early in the semester, we discuss likely organizational patterns for an assignment. I have students write down everything important they can think of about a topic; sometime I have them go to their notes and add other ideas. Then I put ideas on the board, and we discuss where are the best places to put ideas. I distribute a well-written introduction that includes a preview of the organization of the argument and an effective thesis sentence. We also look at a poorly written body paragraph lacking focus and support. In my upper level course, we discuss an excellent paragraph written by a professional scholar and a chapter that I have written. We discuss how to think about the topic and likely approaches to the organization. Usually the discussion about writing is not at the sentence-level but about organization and argument. Sometimes we brainstorm and create charts on the board. This is especially useful when students must handle multiple texts. I discuss sentences, especially how to subordinate lesser ideas to more important ideas. I want students to think about the relationship between sentences and the logic of their argument. We discuss expectations for assignments and likely strategies for approaching the argument. We also look at successful models. We discuss how to develop an argument and possible evidence to use. Before the first assignment, I devote one class to writing. I distribute a handout with criteria for writing, ask students to describe their writing problems, and distribute a sample of a good paper, one containing a clear thesis and an argument. Writing tutor suggestions for in-class discussion An in-class exercise, in pairs: to see the large picture, outline the draft— the thesis and topic sentences. If these make sense, then move on to developing logical transitions. Their biggest problem is not thinking enough about the question before beginning to write. They also need to get feedback on their first full draft and then revise, especially the organization. Students need to start early to include these steps. Students have trouble carrying an argument from the beginning to the end. Upper level students struggle with managing big questions and locating and using sources effectively. Students need to stay focused on the question. They do not carry their thesis through the entire argument. Each paragraph must relate back to the thesis in some way. Students also need to learn how to develop an argument and use sources more fully. Students need to work on how to examine counterarguments, how to logically structure the argument, and how to preview in the introduction the organization of the argument. Students need to develop confidence in their arguments and how to develop an argument. In addition, they usually do not spend enough time on their writing, which contributes to underdeveloped arguments. I assign two eight-page papers, a midterm, and a final. There also are additional short assignments to maintain some dialogue on the readings. I usually assign at least two papers, plus one or two hour exams, and a final. When I teach two forty-student sections of an intro. I am tiring of journals; students are not coming up with interesting ideas. I have found that one-page responses to specific questions about the readings are more effective; they are a way to ensure that students do the readings. I give the same sort of assignments as I give in WI classes, but not as many, and I may not respond in as much detail. Students write six one-to-two page papers and one eight-to-ten page research paper. I require two lab reports, each of which must be revised and resubmitted. The initial version requires only parts of a full lab report data reduction, analysis, and presentation. The revision adds another section or two introduction and discussion. In my thirty to forty student classes, each week half of the class e-mails me one page responses to the reading, due the morning before class. I read and comment on them, and print out copies to bring to class. In a forty student class, I assign at least one and sometimes two papers. I use a grading rubric to summarize comments on papers. In a forty student class, I assign only one paper, but I am uneasy about it. There is no opportunity for the students to learn from only one paper. I also have in-class essays, a mid-term, and a final. In a forty student class, I assign two four-to-six page papers, a final take-home exam, and several fifteen minute in-class writings, announced ahead. Q - Who should take this class? A - The class is suggested for all 9th graders and for any older student who does not know the basics of essay writing or any student planning to take the SAT or ACT Plus Writing. If you are unsure if this class is a good fit, contact me at lisaquing gmail. Students must be age 13 to take this class. Q - Can parents or siblings stay? A - Parents are welcome to listen to the seminar. However, unregistered children and teenagers may not join the class. Please make other arrangements for your other children if you plan to stay and listen. Q - I can't attend this session. Will there be another? A -Please contact me and I will attempt to set up a workshop that fits your schedule. Q - When will the homework essay be returned? A - Homework essay will be returned by mail with suggestions within one week. Q - How many essays will students write in this class? One essay will be written in class. Q - When is the class fee due?

I usually assign at least two papers, plus one or two hour essays, and a final. When I teach two forty-student sections of an polsci 21a analytical essay. I am tiring of journals; students are not coming up with class ideas.

I have intensive that one-page responses to specific questions about the readings are more effective; they are a way to ensure that students do the writings.

I give the same sort of assignments as I give in WI classes, but not as many, and I may not respond in as much detail. Students write six one-to-two page papers and one eight-to-ten page research paper. I require two lab reports, each of which must be revised and resubmitted.

The initial version requires only parts of a full lab report data reduction, analysis, and presentation. The revision adds another section or two introduction and discussion. In my thirty to forty student classes, each week half of the class e-mails me one page responses to the reading, due the morning before class. I read and comment on them, and print out copies to bring to class. In a forty student class, I assign at least one and sometimes two papers.

I use a grading rubric to summarize comments on papers. In a forty student class, I assign only one paper, but I am uneasy about it. Q - Can public school students attend? A - YES!

Writing-Intensive Courses: Perfect Your Skills Across the Curriculum – Colleges of Distinction

Q - Who should take this class? A - The intensive is suggested for all 9th essays and for any classer student who does not writing the basics of essay writing or any student planning to take the SAT or ACT Plus Writing.

Online custom essay writing service

High enrollments in each class at least at the institutions at which most of us teach and the time it takes to give adequate feedback, of course, also frequently limit the amount of writing we can realistically assign. There are workable solutions to have students write often and for instructors to not be overwhelmed with paperwork First, we must remember that just by writing and reading often students will gradually improve and even develop their own writing voice. Students will improve even when we do not mark every error. On this note, we must remember that just because students complete an assignment does not mean we must grade it every-single-time or that we have to provide detailed feedback. Just by writing students are learning. Occasionally, informal and ungraded writing assignments can enhance a class discussion or provide a much needed moment of reflection. Let me give an example: I give my students a quiz at the beginning of every class. For classes that meet once or twice a week, these are 5-to minutes, and for classes that meet once a week, they are 15 minutes. These quizzes count as 25 percent of the overall grade. These always consist of several questions that require thoughtful sentences; these usually require recall and sometimes they require synthesis or application. Advantages to this design are that students pay close attention to my comments; I can direct the argument at an early stage; and the time pressure of in-class writing forces students to use their natural voice. Rubrics make for better papers. Students know what to focus on when writing, and I know what to focus on when grading. When I evaluate a paper, I emphasize one or two significant problems: what the student most needs to work on to write a better next draft or paper. I have students attach a cover sheet with answers to the following questions: What were you asked to work on in your previous paper, and how did you address these problems in the current paper? For introductory courses, I spend a lot of time on thesis sentences. Students e-mail me their proposed thesis sentences, and we discuss them in class. In intro. I distribute a stronger and a weaker paper from the class set, and we discuss them in depth. I devote two or three classes a semester to writing, specifically on how to develop a topic. Early in the semester, we discuss two professional journal articles. One is my favorite example of a bad paper, and the other is a very good paper. We discuss the differences, and the class sees what makes a good piece of writing. We spend time discussing the topic—how to narrow it down to a workable question. Most of our class discussion on writing involves organization. Early in the semester, we discuss likely organizational patterns for an assignment. I have students write down everything important they can think of about a topic; sometime I have them go to their notes and add other ideas. Then I put ideas on the board, and we discuss where are the best places to put ideas. I distribute a well-written introduction that includes a preview of the organization of the argument and an effective thesis sentence. We also look at a poorly written body paragraph lacking focus and support. In my upper level course, we discuss an excellent paragraph written by a professional scholar and a chapter that I have written. We discuss how to think about the topic and likely approaches to the organization. Usually the discussion about writing is not at the sentence-level but about organization and argument. Sometimes we brainstorm and create charts on the board. This is especially useful when students must handle multiple texts. I discuss sentences, especially how to subordinate lesser ideas to more important ideas. I want students to think about the relationship between sentences and the logic of their argument. We discuss expectations for assignments and likely strategies for approaching the argument. We also look at successful models. We discuss how to develop an argument and possible evidence to use. Before the first assignment, I devote one class to writing. I distribute a handout with criteria for writing, ask students to describe their writing problems, and distribute a sample of a good paper, one containing a clear thesis and an argument. Writing tutor suggestions for in-class discussion An in-class exercise, in pairs: to see the large picture, outline the draft— the thesis and topic sentences. If these make sense, then move on to developing logical transitions. Their biggest problem is not thinking enough about the question before beginning to write. They also need to get feedback on their first full draft and then revise, especially the organization. Students need to start early to include these steps. Students have trouble carrying an argument from the beginning to the end. Upper level students struggle with managing big questions and locating and using sources effectively. Students need to stay focused on the question. They do not carry their thesis through the entire argument. Each paragraph must relate back to the thesis in some way. In just one day, my popular and practical high school essay writing workshop will equip your student with the tools for writing a five-paragraph persuasive essay, an essential academic skill. This practical workshop for all high school students will teach the basics of persuasive essay writing. Students will learn to effectively compose a basic five paragraph essay and then enhance the fundamental structure with advanced techniques. Information specific to the ACT essay test and other timed essay tests will be included. Quality in-depth feedback will be provided on two essays so that students will learn from their errors and improve their writing. Students will also learn how to self-evaluate their writing. Elective Course in Major: Many schools now offer a handful of elective courses as writing-intensive classes, providing the same material as non-writing courses but with different assessment models. This allows students more freedom in how they learn to write — they can choose from classes where faculty are teaching creative writing or get help with writing in a subject not covered by the general education requirements or their major. Expanding the available courses on campus to allow for a more individualized path to graduation is key to keeping students engaged in the material. Freshman Seminar: Many freshman seminars are taught as writing-intensive classes, challenging students who may not have had much writing experience in high school to reflect on the course material through papers and in-class essays, and helping them transition to the level of analysis required in higher education. What Can Students Expect? However, instructors may refuse to accept papers with numerous grammatical and mechanical errors and encourage students to edit and resubmit the work. Informal Writing It is writing for oneself. Informal writing helps the student to think on paper; it helps the student to learn in active and reflective ways. This type of writing can take the form of a variety of short in-class or out-of-class activities such as recalling on paper the subject of a previous class, clarifying an important idea during a lecture, brainstorming, speculating, journal writing, and listing. Informal writing can be considered as notes and rough drafts that will later be re-worked into formal writing that is organized and edited for a reader.

If you are unsure if this class is a good fit, contact me at lisaquing gmail. Students must be age 13 to take this class.