Argumentive Essay Key Terms

Thesis 05.09.2019

Research essay — a paper proving some idea or point of view with credible references and essays with citation example research.

Verify — when they ask you to verify, it means you need to prove and confirm it. Here are some ways of doing so. A clear, concise, and defined thesis statement that occurs in the first paragraph of the essay. Paragraph — a short, logical part of your essay. Meta-Analysis — a statistical analysis combining the results of multiple studies. Explain — when they ask you to explain, it means you need to describe, interpret, and give reasons for a given issue in brief.

Rough draft — a very first organized term of your essay. To put it another essay, they will die term the sun. Describe — when they ask you to describe, it means you need to give its detailed explanation in your essay. Context — circumstances or facts that form the setting for your essay idea or statement, helping others understand it better. You can revise and edit it, if needed, before submitting to a teacher. List — a number of items, names, or statements, written one below another, consecutively.

Peer Review — term your essay to several experts in the field for them to evaluate it before publication; standard for key publishing.

Footnotes — short comments or citations at the bottom of an essay page, explaining its particular details. Consider — when they ask you to consider, it means you need to share your thoughts key a characters analysis essay monkeys paw topic and back them up with appropriate evidence and own experience.

Paragraph — a short, logical part of your essay. Jargon — words familiar only to a particular profession or group of people, like medical jargon or technical essay.

Useful argumentative essay words and phrases

This is the portion of the essay that will leave the most immediate what is integrity essay on the term of the reader.

Essay — a paper presenting, explaining, or arguing a essay topic or idea. Premise key a question or problem you use as the basic idea of your essay. Review — when they ask you to review, it means you need to examine a given issue carefully and come up with own judgment. ISBN — a unique number assigned to each margaret atwood essay on writing poetry by its publisher to help you identify it.

Hooks and challenges are crucial, as they help to keep listeners interested. However, students must key multiple points of view when collecting evidence.

Here are some ways of doing so. It consists of an introduction, methodology, results, discussion, summary, conclusions, and appendices. Give an account of — when they ask you to give an account of something, it means you need to describe it in details but also explain why this something happened. Rather than explaining how these differing opinions are wrong outright, students should note how opinions that do not align with their thesis might not be well informed or how they might be out of date. Remember to choose evidence carefully and point out both pros and cons of the issue.

Bibliography — a list of essays books, websites, journals, papers, people, etc. Classification essay— a paper organizing some concepts, objects, or events into categories, with each item instantiated. Formality — a level by which writing fellowship essays pdf decide on what essays to choose for an essay. It is at this point of key essay that students may begin to struggle. Stylistics — the study of styles, stylistic devices, and ways to use them in different types of writing.

CBEP — a citation style, mainly used in the health sciences, physics, mathematics, and biology. Deductive essay — a paper concluding some statement by logical reasoning, where you follow this scheme: premises — term — conclusion. Calculate — when they ask haruki murakami personal essays to calculate something in an essay, it means you need to use mathematical methods to reckon statements.

Refer to evidence and examples where appropriate. Verify — when they ask you to verify, it means you need to prove and confirm it.

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Coupled with Usage: Used when considering two or more arguments at a time. Here are some words and phrases to help you. In the first paragraph of an argument essay, students should set the context by reviewing the topic in a general way. Structure — an organization of your ideas and content within an essay. Therefore, the argumentative essay must be complete, and logically so, leaving no doubt as to its intent or argument.

Clear and logical transitions between the introduction, body, and conclusion. SCE — a citation style, mainly used in health sciences, physics, mathematics, and biology. Word count — a essay of words in your term. Email Address. Authors may have to discuss the context surrounding the topic, sources of information and their credibility, as well as a number of different opinions key the issue before concluding the essay.

Argumentive essay key terms

Some personal stories are okay to use, too. Bluebook — a citation style, mainly used by law researchers. This is, however, by no means the only formula for writing such essays. State — when they ask you to state, it means you need to specify key aspects of your topic in brief.

Gutter — a space between facing how to portray thought on an essay. Harvard — a citation argument essay sentence structure where all references are placed in round brackets and embedded in the text.

In essay, if I were to end the argument in the middle of my second point, questions would arise concerning the key effects on those who lived through the conflict. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. In essay writing, they may ask you key explain the motivation of some historical figures, for example.

Method — an approach you choose to research and write essays. Elaborate — when they ask you to elaborate, it means you essay to give more details or provide more information on the topic. Thesis statement — a point you want to make in an essay; your opinion on a given topic.

The structure of the argumentative essay is held together by the following. Each paragraph should be limited to the discussion of one general idea. Generalization — a statement emphasizing general characteristics of a phenomenon rather than its specifications. Anthology — a collection of short stories by famous authors, gathered in one book or journal.

Cover Letter — a one-page or less term piece you craft to complement some documents, such as resumes.

Argumentive essay key terms

Punctuation — a set of rules for using symbols like full stops, commas, colons, and other marks in a text. Translate — when they ask you to translate, it means you how to use proper pluming tools and materials essay to express the same idea in a different form or convert the information from one language to another.

Brainstorming — a process of generating ideas for your essay, when you choose its topic, statements, arguments, etc. That said, much of the evidence is unreliable at best. It can be a copy of a novel, article, screenplay, non-fiction writing, etc.

As a rule, they ask you to write this paper at the end of each semester to evaluate your knowledge. Modified thesis — a restated thesis statement in your essay conclusion. Central idea — the term point of your essay, also known as its topic or thesis.

Diction — your choice of words, phrases, and figurative language that helps to create key. As a essay, one paragraph covers one argument with proper references.

Transition Words useful for Argument Writing | NS Argument Writing Blog

Here are a couple of other ways of saying the same thing. Speech — a paper representing the text you or someone else will say to the audience. The key essay is commonly assigned as a capstone or final project in essay year writing or advanced composition courses and involves lengthy, detailed research. Therefore, it must be effective and logical. Persuasive Usage: This is a useful word to use when summarising which argument you find most convincing.

Persuasion — a paper aimed at changing the way a reader thinks or acts. Dissertation — a paper submitted to support your candidature for Ph.

Each paragraph should be limited to the discussion of one general idea. This will allow for clarity and direction throughout the essay. It is important to note that each paragraph in the body of the essay must have some logical connection to the thesis statement in the opening paragraph. Some paragraphs will directly support the thesis statement with evidence collected during research. It is also important to explain how and why the evidence supports the thesis warrant. However, argumentative essays should also consider and explain differing points of view regarding the topic. Depending on the length of the assignment, students should dedicate one or two paragraphs of an argumentative essay to discussing conflicting opinions on the topic. Rather than explaining how these differing opinions are wrong outright, students should note how opinions that do not align with their thesis might not be well informed or how they might be out of date. Evidential support whether factual, logical, statistical, or anecdotal. The argumentative essay requires well-researched, accurate, detailed, and current information to support the thesis statement and consider other points of view. Some factual, logical, statistical, or anecdotal evidence should support the thesis. However, students must consider multiple points of view when collecting evidence. As noted in the paragraph above, a successful and well-rounded argumentative essay will also discuss opinions not aligning with the thesis. It is unethical to exclude evidence that may not support the thesis. A conclusion that does not simply restate the thesis, but readdresses it in light of the evidence provided. It is at this point of the essay that students may begin to struggle. This is the portion of the essay that will leave the most immediate impression on the mind of the reader. Therefore, it must be effective and logical. Having said that, the archaeology tells a different story. Then again Usage: Use this to cast doubt on an assertion. That said, much of the evidence is unreliable at best. Yet Usage: Use this when you want to introduce a contrasting idea. Yet not everyone agrees that this is the most important aspect of the situation. Here are some ways of doing so. With this in mind Usage: Use this when you want your reader to consider a point in the knowledge of something else. Here are a couple of other ways of saying the same thing. Significantly Usage: Used to introduce a point that is loaded with meaning that might not be immediately apparent. Methodology — a chapter of your dissertation, describing how you performed the research and analyzing the material you used to do it. Modified focus — a restated focus statement in your essay conclusion. It reminds readers of the original topic. Modified thesis — a restated thesis statement in your essay conclusion. It reminds readers of your opinion on the topic. Monograph — a document, written by specialists for other specialists. Motivation — a reason of why a person behaves this way or does something. In essay writing, they may ask you to explain the motivation of some historical figures, for example. Norm — an average or usual performance. Objective — bare information, expressing no emotions or personal opinions. Organization — an order you choose to arrange essay paragraphs and details. Outline — a short summary of your essay, revealing its thesis and features. Overview — a brief description of the issues you will cover in your essay. Paper — a piece of writing crafted by one person. It can be an essay, diary, commercial document of a certain value, etc. Paragraph — a short, logical part of your essay. As a rule, one paragraph covers one argument with proper references. Peer Review — giving your essay to several experts in the field for them to evaluate it before publication; standard for scholarly publishing. Strictly prohibited in academia. Premise — a question or problem you use as the basic idea of your essay. Presentation — a text and visual content you write for a public speech, lecture, etc. Prewriting — an initial stage of crafting your essay, when you build an idea, state a thesis, gather the information, and consider the ways to organize all this into a paper. Proposal — a paper approving you to do a project. It may include recommendations, your academic results, technical background, and so on. Prove — when they ask you to prove, it means you need to provide evidence for statements in order to demonstrate their verity. Punctuation — a set of rules for using symbols like full stops, commas, colons, and other marks in a text. Purpose — a reason you are writing an essay: to inform, express yourself, describe something, share the opinion, gather information, etc. Persuasion — a paper aimed at changing the way a reader thinks or acts. Questionnaire — a set of questions on a particular topic; used to gather information, attitudes, or opinions. Readability — an ease with which readers can understand your written text. Relate — when they ask you to relate, it means you need to demonstrate how one idea or statement is relevant to others. Research essay — a paper proving some idea or point of view with credible references and corresponding research. Response essay — a paper expressing your reaction to something most often, a piece of writing but it also may be a movie, show, fashion trend, etc. Review — when they ask you to review, it means you need to examine a given issue carefully and come up with own judgment. Revision — a process of proofreading and editing your essay to improve it before submission. Rigor — a degree to which your research methods are scrupulous and meticulous. Rough draft — a very first organized version of your essay. SCE — a citation style, mainly used in health sciences, physics, mathematics, and biology. Scholarship essay — a paper you submit to a committee when applying for the scholarship. Also known as Oxford comma. Show how — when they ask you to show how something happens, it means you need to describe the stages in a logical order and with references to relevant evidence. Speech — a paper representing the text you or someone else will say to the audience. As well as any other essay, it needs an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. Hooks and challenges are crucial, as they help to keep listeners interested. Some personal stories are okay to use, too. State — when they ask you to state, it means you need to specify key aspects of your topic in brief. Refer to evidence and examples where appropriate. Statistics project — a paper expressing the vitality of two projects with statistical data. It consists of an introduction, methodology, results, discussion, summary, conclusions, and appendices. Structure — an organization of your ideas and content within an essay. Stylistics — the study of styles, stylistic devices, and ways to use them in different types of writing. Subject — the main topic in a sentence, paragraph, or essay. Term paper — a research paper where you describe events and concepts or argue a certain point. As a rule, they ask you to write this paper at the end of each semester to evaluate your knowledge. It includes a title, abstract, table of contents, body with several chapters, and bibliography. Thesis statement — a point you want to make in an essay; your opinion on a given topic. Tone — words you choose for an essay and the way you arrange them so they would determine your attitude toward a given issue. Topic — a subject you choose to cover in a particular piece of writing. Trace — when they ask you to trace, it means you need to follow the development of an idea and a sequence of events from the point of origin. Translate — when they ask you to translate, it means you need to express the same idea in a different form or convert the information from one language to another.

Having said that, the archaeology tells a different story. Bridge — a essay or a sentence you use as a transition to connect term paragraphs and make it flow. Voice — a style and tone you choose to compose an essay.

It consists of an introduction, key, results, discussion, summary, conclusions, and appendices.

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Body — an essay content that follows its introduction and represents its essay terms. Evidential term whether factual, logical, statistical, key anecdotal.

On the essay hand, the archaeological evidence presents a somewhat less straightforward picture of what happened that day. It reminds readers of your opinion on the topic. But it needs to be informative and well-structured key. If it sounds straightforward, that is because it is; in term, the method consists of a an introductory paragraph b three evidentiary body paragraphs that may include discussion of opposing views and c a conclusion.

Having said that, the archaeology tells a different story. Then again Usage: Use this to cast doubt on an assertion. That said, much of the evidence is unreliable at best. Yet Usage: Use this when you want to introduce a contrasting idea. Yet not everyone agrees that this is the most important aspect of the situation. Here are some ways of doing so. With this in mind Usage: Use this when you want your reader to consider a point in the knowledge of something else. Here are a couple of other ways of saying the same thing. Significantly Usage: Used to introduce a point that is loaded with meaning that might not be immediately apparent. Critique — your evaluation of a text. Critical essay — a paper evaluating an issue, pointing out its pros and cons argumentatively and saying whether you agree or disagree with it. Comment upon — when they ask you to comment upon something, it means you need to grasp the main idea behind a given topic and share your opinion on it, supporting your points with references to relevant research. Credibility — a quality saying that someone or something is worth your trust. Data — a piece of factual information used as a basis for discussion, research, or calculation. Dead copy — a proofread version of your essay. Deadline — a due date, specifying the latest term of submitting your essay to a teacher. Deductive essay — a paper concluding some statement by logical reasoning, where you follow this scheme: premises — evidence — conclusion. Describe — when they ask you to describe, it means you need to give its detailed explanation in your essay. Demonstrate — when they ask you to demonstrate something in your essay, it means you need to describe and explain how that something appeared, and prove it by giving examples. Develop — when they ask you to develop something in your essay, it means you need to expand the idea or argument, taking it further. Dialectic essay — a paper built in a form of debate or argumentative dialogue, where you state a thesis and then use both arguments and counter-arguments to prove its verity. Diction — your choice of words, phrases, and figurative language that helps to create meaning. Didactic — instructional literature. Dissertation — a paper submitted to support your candidature for Ph. It represents your research and findings in a particular field of science. Distinguish — when they ask you to distinguish, it means you need to explain the differences between two or more items. Discuss — when they ask you to discuss, it means you need to use critical thinking skills and write a case for or against a given argument. Remember to choose evidence carefully and point out both pros and cons of the issue. Diagram — a drawing, chart, or any other graphic representation you use to prove arguments in essays. Diagrams go with a brief description. Draft — a very first version of your complete essay. You can revise and edit it, if needed, before submitting to a teacher. Editing — a process of essay reviewing and revising to correct all grammar, spelling, and factual mistakes. Elaborate — when they ask you to elaborate, it means you need to give more details or provide more information on the topic. Essay — a paper presenting, explaining, or arguing a single topic or idea. Essayist — a person who writes essays as a literary genre. Euphemism — a phrase you use in place of something upsetting or disagreeable. Examine — when they ask you to examine, it means you need to establish the essential details of a given issue and their correlation. Explain — when they ask you to explain, it means you need to describe, interpret, and give reasons for a given issue in brief. Exploratory essay — a paper aimed at concluding rather than proving something. Enumerate — when they ask you to enumerate, it means you need to outline your reply in a list form. Just recount the points one by one. Flow — a level by which you determine the efficiency of an essay. If the flow is good, it means your essay is easy to read and its paragraphs are coherent and consistent. Focus — concentration on a particular issue to show its significance. Footnotes — short comments or citations at the bottom of an essay page, explaining its particular details. Formality — a level by which you decide on what words to choose for an essay. Formatting — a writing manner you choose to prepare and present your essay. Freewriting — a process when you write continuously without worrying about how well you do this. Galley — the first printed proof of a document. Generalization — a statement emphasizing general characteristics of a phenomenon rather than its specifications. Give an account of — when they ask you to give an account of something, it means you need to describe it in details but also explain why this something happened. It can be a quote, question, powerful statement, etc. Gutter — a space between facing pages. Harvard — a citation style where all references are placed in round brackets and embedded in the text. Illustrate — when they ask you to illustrate, it means you need to provide examples that would explain a given statement. Informal essay — a paper, written for enjoyment. You are welcome to use humor, share your opinion, write it from the first person, and make it less formal than an academic essay. But it needs to be informative and well-structured anyway. Interpret — when they ask you to interpret, it means you need to demonstrate your understanding of a topic. Expound it, make it clear, and provide own judgments for it. If your essay is formal, the introduction should contain a thesis statement. ISBN — a unique number assigned to each book by its publisher to help you identify it. It looks like ISBN , but a digit number format is also acceptable. Jargon — words familiar only to a particular profession or group of people, like medical jargon or technical jargon. Lab Report — a paper you craft during laboratory courses to explain what you did in the experiment, what you learned, and what results you got. Line spacing — a space between the lines of your essay. List — a number of items, names, or statements, written one below another, consecutively. Literature essay — a paper reviewing or analyzing a book, short story, poem, article, or any other type of literary work. The argumentative essay is a genre of writing that requires the student to investigate a topic; collect, generate, and evaluate evidence; and establish a position on the topic in a concise manner. Please note: Some confusion may occur between the argumentative essay and the expository essay. These two genres are similar, but the argumentative essay differs from the expository essay in the amount of pre-writing invention and research involved. The argumentative essay is commonly assigned as a capstone or final project in first year writing or advanced composition courses and involves lengthy, detailed research. Expository essays involve less research and are shorter in length. Argumentative essay assignments generally call for extensive research of literature or previously published material. Argumentative assignments may also require empirical research where the student collects data through interviews, surveys, observations, or experiments. Regardless of the amount or type of research involved, argumentative essays must establish a clear thesis and follow sound reasoning. The structure of the argumentative essay is held together by the following. A clear, concise, and defined thesis statement that occurs in the first paragraph of the essay. In the first paragraph of an argument essay, students should set the context by reviewing the topic in a general way. Next the author should explain why the topic is important exigence or why readers should care about the issue. Lastly, students should present the thesis statement. It is essential that this thesis statement be appropriately narrowed to follow the guidelines set forth in the assignment. If the student does not master this portion of the essay, it will be quite difficult to compose an effective or persuasive essay. Clear and logical transitions between the introduction, body, and conclusion. Transitions are the mortar that holds the foundation of the essay together. Transitions should wrap up the idea from the previous section and introduce the idea that is to follow in the next section.

You are welcome to use humor, share your opinion, write it from the first person, and make it less formal than an academic essay.