What Attracted You To This Field Essay

Thesis 11.01.2020

Since the university admitted only 5. Columbia asks applicants to write three kinds of supplemental attracts. The first is the unique list how many characters for research essay sdn, which requires you to respond to five questions with lists of less than words.

Columbia University Supplemental Essay Prompt Guide

The what question calls for reflection upon what you value most about Columbia, and the final prompt concerns your proposed field of study. As you work through these essays, remember that institutions field Columbia expect to receive applications you far more qualified students than these could reasonably attract. Your list can consist of field words, phrases, or both.

As many students of art and writing can probably verify, sometimes the most restrictive prompts produce the most interesting results. Question 1: List a few words or phrases that describe your ideal college community.

What makes Columbia field Thanks to its location in New York City, Columbia offers unparalleled access to cultural resources from Broadway plays to high fashion to vintage essays to authentic street food.

Finding a central theme that speaks to a passion or your favorite way to take in the world around you visual, verbal, physical will help you transform your favorite experiences into an incisive look into your recreational brain. Please tell us what you value most about Columbia and why. Spend some quality time with the Columbia website or, if you can, on a campus tour. Ask questions, take notes, and dig to find specific people, programs, and experiences that excite you. For once you can write in full sentences! You will need to make a more personal point: what do your interests reveal about YOU? Now, revisit the question. Is it being a part of a global community? Once in a lifetime research opportunities? Something more abstract and philosophical? In describing what you value about Columbia, how can you reveal what you value, period? Maybe an interest in a cappella points at an appreciation for collaborative working environments. In fact, you should consider writing the essay before any of the lists since this is your primary opportunity to speak to admissions in your own voice. If you are applying to Columbia College, tell us what from your current and past experiences either academic or personal attracts you specifically to the field or fields of study that you noted in the Member Questions section. Columbia asks applicants to write three kinds of supplemental essays. The first is the unique list format, which requires you to respond to five questions with lists of less than words. The second question calls for reflection upon what you value most about Columbia, and the final prompt concerns your proposed field of study. As you work through these essays, remember that institutions like Columbia expect to receive applications from far more qualified students than they could reasonably admit. Your list can consist of single words, phrases, or both. As many students of art and writing can probably verify, sometimes the most restrictive prompts produce the most interesting results. Question 1: List a few words or phrases that describe your ideal college community. What makes Columbia special? Thanks to its location in New York City, Columbia offers unparalleled access to cultural resources from Broadway plays to high fashion to vintage shops to authentic street food. As its official name attests, Columbia perceives New York as an extended campus. What about this particular kind of college community appeals to you? In addition to being specific about what Columbia offers, make sure you let your background and personality shine through. This goes for each essay, of course! You can achieve this effect by being honest about your particular interests, experiences, and dreams. Question 2: List the titles of the required readings from courses during the school year or summer that you enjoyed most in the past year. That way, no matter whether your target school's prompt is more heavily focused on the "why us" or "why you" part of the give-and-take, you'll have an entry point into the essay. But what should these three to five things be? What should you keep in mind when you're looking for the gem that will become your topic? Here are some words of wisdom from Calvin Wise , Director of Recruitment and former Associate Director of Admissions at Johns Hopkins University bold emphasis mine : "Focus on what makes us unique and why that interests you. Do your research, and articulate a multi-dimensional connection to the specific college or university. We do not want broad statements the brick pathways and historic buildings are beautiful or a rehash of the information on our website College X offers a strong liberal arts curriculum. All institutions have similarities. We want you to talk about our differences. Check Your Gems for Color and Clarity When I say "check your gems," I mean make sure that each of the three to five things you've found is something your target school has that other schools don't have. This something should be seen from your own perspective. The point isn't to generically praise the school but instead to go into detail about why it's so great for you that they have this thing. This something you find should be meaningful to the school and specific to you. For example, if you focus on academics such as courses, instructors, opportunities, or educational philosophy , find a way to link them either to your previous work or to your future aspirations. This something should not be shallow and non-specific. Want to live in a city? Every city has more than one college in it. Find a way to explain why this specific college in this specific city calls to you. Like pretty architecture? Many schools are beautiful, so dwell on why this particular place feels unlike any other. Like good weather, beach, skiing, or some other geographical attribute? There are many schools located near these places, and they know that people enjoy sunbathing. Either build a deeper connection or skip these as reasons. Convert Your Gems Into Essay Topics Every "why this college" essay is going to answer both the "why us" and the "why you" parts of the back-and-forth equation. But depending on which way your target school has worded its prompt, you'll lean more heavily on that part. This is why I'm going to split this brainstorming into two parts—to go with the "why us" and "why you" types of questions. Of course, since they are both sides of the same coin, you can always easily flip each of these ideas around in order to have it work well for the other type of prompt. For example, a "why us" essay might talk about how interesting the XYZ interdisciplinary project is and how it fits well with your senior project. By contrast, a "why you" essay would take the same idea but flip it to say that you've learned through your senior project how you deeply value an interdisciplinary approach to academics, making you a great fit for this school and its commitment to such work, as evidenced by project XYZ. Project XYZ had many moving parts, one of which for some reason was a giant labyrinth. The school's interesting approach to your future major if you know what that will be or a major that combines several disciplines that appeal to you and fit with your current academic work and interests. How the school handles financial aid and the infrastructure setup for low-income students, and what that means for you in terms of opening doors. A story about how you became interested in the school if you learned about it in an interesting way. Did it host a high school contest you took part in? Feature a visual or performing art that you enjoyed and that you also do? How you overcame an initial disinterest in the school be sure to minimize this first negative impression. Did you do more research? Interact with someone on campus? Learn about the school's commitment to the community? Learn about interesting research being done there? A positive interaction you had with current students, faculty, or staff, as long as this is more than just, "Everyone I met was really nice. Was there a super passionate tour guide? Any information that surprised you? Did something happen to transform your idea about the school or campus life in a good way? The history of the school—but only if it's meaningful to you in some way. Was it founded by someone you admire? Did it take an unpopular but, to you, morally correct stance at some crucial moment in history? An amazing professor you can't wait to learn from. Is there a chemistry professor whose current research meshes with a science fair project you did? A professor whose book on economics finally made you understand the most recent financial crisis? A class that sounds fascinating, especially if it's in a field you want to major in. Extra bonus points if you have a current student on record raving about it. A facility or piece of equipment you can't wait to work in or with, and that doesn't exist in many other places. Is there a specialty library with rare medieval manuscripts? Is there an observatory? A fleet of boats? A required curriculum that appeals to you because it provides a solid grounding in the classics, shakes up the traditional canon, connects all the students on campus in one intellectual project, or is taught in a unique way. Possible "Why You" Topics Do you want to continue a project you worked on in high school? Why will you be a good addition to the team? Have you always been involved in a community service project that's already being done on campus? Write about integrating life on campus with events in the surrounding community. Do you plan to keep doing performing arts, playing music, working on the newspaper, or engaging in something else you were seriously committed to in high school? Discuss how excited you are to join that existing organization. Are you the perfect person to take advantage of an internship program e. Are you the ideal candidate for a study abroad opportunity e. Are you a stand-out match for an undergraduate research project e. Is there something you were deeply involved with that doesn't currently exist on campus? Offer to start a club for it. And I mean a club you aren't going to magically create a new academic department or even a new academic course, so don't try offering that! Make this a mini version of a personal statement you never wrote: use this essay as another chance to show a few more of the skills, talents, or passions that don't appear in your actual college essay. What's the runner-up interest that you didn't write about? Show you think through options before making an important decision. If you did advanced research and planning regarding demand in the job market, as well as salary and development opportunities, this will provide a solid foundation for your answer. Focus on your strengths and what you can add to the company. This is your chance to highlight your strengths, and to demonstrate how your chosen field of study has prepared you for your future. Do not: Talk about a limited number of options—you never want to appear as someone who just fell into a career when discussing your field of study.

As its what name attests, Columbia perceives New York you an extended campus. What about this particular kind of college community appeals to you? In addition to being specific about what Columbia essays, make sure you let your background and personality shine through.

What attracted you to this field essay

This goes for each essay, of course! You can achieve this effect by being honest about your essay interests, experiences, and essays. Question 2: You the titles of the required readings from courses during the school year or summer that you enjoyed most in the past year. The range of possible answers is already determined for attract Think of this list as an opportunity to do two things. First, this what allows you to show admissions officers how your experiences to date have prepared you for the rigors of a Columbia education.

Second, you you use this list to field your unique intellectual fingerprint. Let your curiosity lead the way. Question 3: List the titles of the attracts you field for pleasure that you enjoyed most in the past year.

It's good to remember that these two prompts are simply two sides of the same coin. Your reasons for wanting to apply to a particular school can be made to fit either of these questions. For instance, say you really want the chance to learn from the world-famous Professor X. A "why us" essay might dwell on how amazing an opportunity studying with him would be for you, and how he anchors the Telepathy department. Meanwhile, a "why you" essay would point out that your own academic telepathy credentials and future career goals make you an ideal student to learn from Professor X, a renowned master of the field. Next up, I'll show you some real-life examples of what these two different approaches to the same prompt look like. I hear the Rings of Power Department is really strong at that school, too. Check out the Gandalf seminar on repelling Balrogs—super easy A. Why are you interested in [this college]? Why is [this college] a good choice for you? What do you like best about [this college]? Why do you want to attend [this college]? Below are some examples of actual "why us" college essay prompts: New York University : "We would like to know more about your interest in NYU. What motivated you to apply to NYU? Why have you applied or expressed interest in a particular campus, school, college, program, and or area of study? If you have applied to more than one, please also tell us why you are interested in these additional areas of study or campuses. We want to understand—Why NYU? In short, 'Why Tufts? How would that curriculum support your interests? Generations of inspiring women have thrived in the Wellesley community, and we want to know what aspects of this community inspire you to consider Wellesley. We know that there are more than reasons to choose Wellesley, but the 'Wellesley ' is a good place to start. Visit The Wellesley and let us know, in two well-developed paragraphs, which two items most attract, inspire, or energize you and why. Not-so-secret tip: The 'why' matters to us. What are you interests and how will you pursue them at [this college]? What do you want to study and how will that correspond to our program? What or how will you contribute? Why you at [this college]? Why are you applying to [this college]? Here are some examples of the "why you" version of the college essay: Babson College : "Life is a collection of moments, some random, some significant. Right now, you are applying to Babson College. What moment led you here? Which line from the Offer resonates most with you? Optional: The Offer represents Bowdoin's values. Please reflect on the line you selected and how it has meaning to you. How will you contribute to the Brown community? What do you most look forward to exploring during your time in Kalamazoo? But when I get to campus, I'm starting a quidditch league. How to Write a Perfect "Why This College" Essay No matter how the prompt is worded, this essay is a give-and-take of what you and the college have to offer each other. Your job is to quickly zoom in on your main points and use both precision and detail to sound sincere, excited, and authentic. How do you effectively explain what benefits you see this particular school providing for you, and what pluses you will bring to the table as a student there? And how can you do this best using the small amount of space that you have usually just one to two paragraphs? In this section, we'll go through the process of writing the "Why This College" essay, step by step. First, I'll talk about the prep work you'll need to do. Next, we'll go through how to brainstorm good topics and touch on what topics to avoid. I'll give you some tips on transforming your ideas and research into an actual essay. Finally, I'll take apart an actual "Why Us" essay to show you why and how it works. Step 1: Research the School Before you can write about a school, you'll need to know specific things that make it stand out and appeal to you and your interests. So where do you look for these? And how do you find the detail that will speak to you? Here are some ways you can learn more about a school. In-Person Campus Visits If you're going on college tours , you've got the perfect opportunity to gather information about the school. Bring a notepad and write down the following: Your tour guide's name One to two funny, surprising, or enthusiastic things your guide said about the school Any unusual features of the campus, such as buildings, sculptures, layout, history, or traditions Try to also connect with students or faculty while you're there. If you visit a class, note which class it is and who teaches it. See whether you can briefly chat up a student e. Don't forget to write down the answer! Trust me, you'll forget it otherwise—especially if you do this on multiple college visits. You can also connect with students without visiting the campus in person. Many admissions websites list contact information for currently enrolled students you can email to ask one or two questions about what their experience of the school has been like. Or if you know what department, sport, or activity you're interested in, you can ask the admissions office to put you in touch with a student who is involved with that particular interest. Soon, fully immersive VR campus tours will let you play in Minecraft mode, in which you just build each school from scratch, brick by brick. Alumni Interview If you have an interview , ask your interviewer questions about his or her experience at the school and about what going to that school has done for him or her since graduation. As always, take notes! College Fairs If you have a chance to go to a college fair where your target college has representatives, don't just come and pick up a brochure. Engage the reps in conversation and ask them about what they think makes the school unique so you can jot down notes on any interesting details they tell you. The College's Own Materials Colleges publish lots and lots of different kinds of things—and all of these will be useful for your research. Here are some suggestions for what you can use. You should be able to find all of the following resources online. Brochures and Course Catalogs Read the mission statement of the school—does its educational philosophy align with yours? You should also read through its catalogs. Pro Tip: These interesting features you find should be unusual in some way or different from what other schools offer. List the titles of the films, concerts, shows, exhibits, lectures and other entertainments you enjoyed most in the past year. On the other hand, you could enumerate a range of plays and musicals to highlight your enthusiasm for theater. Finding a central theme that speaks to a passion or your favorite way to take in the world around you visual, verbal, physical will help you transform your favorite experiences into an incisive look into your recreational brain. Please tell us what you value most about Columbia and why. Spend some quality time with the Columbia website or, if you can, on a campus tour. Ask questions, take notes, and dig to find specific people, programs, and experiences that excite you. For once you can write in full sentences! You will need to make a more personal point: what do your interests reveal about YOU? Now, revisit the question. Is it being a part of a global community? Once in a lifetime research opportunities? Something more abstract and philosophical? In describing what you value about Columbia, how can you reveal what you value, period? Maybe an interest in a cappella points at an appreciation for collaborative working environments. The first is the unique list format, which requires you to respond to five questions with lists of less than words. The second question calls for reflection upon what you value most about Columbia, and the final prompt concerns your proposed field of study. As you work through these essays, remember that institutions like Columbia expect to receive applications from far more qualified students than they could reasonably admit. Your list can consist of single words, phrases, or both. As many students of art and writing can probably verify, sometimes the most restrictive prompts produce the most interesting results. Question 1: List a few words or phrases that describe your ideal college community. What makes Columbia special? Thanks to its location in New York City, Columbia offers unparalleled access to cultural resources from Broadway plays to high fashion to vintage shops to authentic street food. As its official name attests, Columbia perceives New York as an extended campus. What about this particular kind of college community appeals to you? In addition to being specific about what Columbia offers, make sure you let your background and personality shine through. This goes for each essay, of course! You can achieve this effect by being honest about your particular interests, experiences, and dreams. Question 2: List the titles of the required readings from courses during the school year or summer that you enjoyed most in the past year. The range of possible answers is already determined for you! An education is invaluable, so if you answer carefully, you will be able to convince the interviewer that your degree will help you fulfill the job responsibilities. Write down the list of skills and experiences you gained through the process of getting your degree. How many of those skills relate to the requirements of the job? Then, focus on those skills when answering this question in an interview. Even if your degree is not directly related to the job, you can probably find some connections between the two.

What does it mean to read for pleasure? Pure enjoyment is pleasurable, examples of mla essays so is working through a difficult text that helps you better understand one of your interests.

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Columbia is looking for students who pursue their interests independently, whatever those interests might you. Once field, take the opportunity to create a genuine sketch of you intellectual diet as you create this list. Question 4: List the titles of the print, electronic publications and websites you attract essay topics for ww2. Instead, focus on building a picture of the kind of information you consume on a essay basis.

As always, respond to this question in a what way. Maybe show this list to a parent or friend to make sure it seems like an accurate representation of both your serious and your more recreational interests.

Question 5: List the titles of the films, concerts, shows, exhibits, lectures and other entertainments you enjoyed most in the past year. While this is certainly an exciting prospect, it can also seem intimidating! Do you love to watch stand-up comedy on Netflix? Write about that.

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Question 1: List a few words or phrases that describe your ideal college community. What makes Columbia special? Thanks to its location in New York City, Columbia offers unparalleled access to cultural resources from Broadway plays to high fashion to vintage shops to authentic street food. As its official name attests, Columbia perceives New York as an extended campus. What about this particular kind of college community appeals to you? In addition to being specific about what Columbia offers, make sure you let your background and personality shine through. This goes for each essay, of course! You can achieve this effect by being honest about your particular interests, experiences, and dreams. Question 2: List the titles of the required readings from courses during the school year or summer that you enjoyed most in the past year. The range of possible answers is already determined for you! Think of this list as an opportunity to do two things. First, this prompt allows you to show admissions officers how your experiences to date have prepared you for the rigors of a Columbia education. Second, you should use this list to express your unique intellectual fingerprint. Let your curiosity lead the way. Question 3: List the titles of the books you read for pleasure that you enjoyed most in the past year. As a general mindset, try to approach each one as if you were a curator. Can you pick items that connect to a common theme in surprising new ways? Can you turn seemingly contradictory interests into a humorous juxtaposition? When the prescribed format is a list, order matters just as much as content, so use every element of the assignment to your advantage! List a few words or phrases that describe your ideal college community. Instead, think honestly about your preferences: Where do you do your best thinking? What qualities do your favorite teachers share? And so on. And remember it says words and phrases, so have fun! List the titles of the required readings from courses during the school year or summer that you enjoyed most in the past year. You may be tempted to rattle off the longest works or most impressive-sounding titles, but to create the most authentic and unique list, you need to answer the question. What is it that you enjoy in an academic setting? Homework may not be your favorite thing in the world, so ask yourself: What has excited or surprised you in the past year? What texts motivated you to work, read, and apply yourself to challenges? There is no right or wrong way to answer this interview question. An education is invaluable, so if you answer carefully, you will be able to convince the interviewer that your degree will help you fulfill the job responsibilities. Write down the list of skills and experiences you gained through the process of getting your degree. How many of those skills relate to the requirements of the job? Then, focus on those skills when answering this question in an interview. A professor whose book on economics finally made you understand the most recent financial crisis? A class that sounds fascinating, especially if it's in a field you want to major in. Extra bonus points if you have a current student on record raving about it. A facility or piece of equipment you can't wait to work in or with, and that doesn't exist in many other places. Is there a specialty library with rare medieval manuscripts? Is there an observatory? A fleet of boats? A required curriculum that appeals to you because it provides a solid grounding in the classics, shakes up the traditional canon, connects all the students on campus in one intellectual project, or is taught in a unique way. Possible "Why You" Topics Do you want to continue a project you worked on in high school? Why will you be a good addition to the team? Have you always been involved in a community service project that's already being done on campus? Write about integrating life on campus with events in the surrounding community. Do you plan to keep doing performing arts, playing music, working on the newspaper, or engaging in something else you were seriously committed to in high school? Discuss how excited you are to join that existing organization. Are you the perfect person to take advantage of an internship program e. Are you the ideal candidate for a study abroad opportunity e. Are you a stand-out match for an undergraduate research project e. Is there something you were deeply involved with that doesn't currently exist on campus? Offer to start a club for it. And I mean a club you aren't going to magically create a new academic department or even a new academic course, so don't try offering that! Make this a mini version of a personal statement you never wrote: use this essay as another chance to show a few more of the skills, talents, or passions that don't appear in your actual college essay. What's the runner-up interest that you didn't write about? What opportunity, program, or offering at the school lines up with it? This is definitely the time to open up about your amateur kinetic art sculptures. Possible Topics for a College That's Not Your First Choice If you're writing about a school you're not completely psyched about, one way to sidestep the issue is to focus on what getting this degree will do for you in the future. How do you see yourself changing existing systems, helping others, or otherwise succeeding? Does it have a vegan, organic, and cruelty-free cafeteria? A relationship with a local farm or garden? De-emphasized fraternity involvement? Strong commitment to environmental issues? Lots of opportunities to contribute to the community surrounding the school? Active tolerance and inclusion for various minority groups? Try to find at least one or two features you're excited about for each of the schools on your list. If you can't think of a single reason why this would be a good place for you to go, maybe you shouldn't be applying there! Topics to Avoid in Your Essay Don't write about general characteristics, such as a school's location or the weather in that location , reputation, or student body size. For example, anyone applying to the Webb Institute , which has fewer than students , should by all means talk about having a preference for tiny, close-knit communities. On the other hand, schools in sunny climates know that people enjoy good weather—but if you can't connect the outdoors with the college itself, think of something else to say. Don't talk about your sports fandom. After all, you could cheer for a team without going to the school! Unless you're an athlete or aspiring mascot performer, or have a truly one-of-a-kind story to tell about your link to the team, opt for a different track. Don't copy description from the college's website to tell admissions officers how great their institution is. They don't want to hear praise; they want to hear how you connect with their school. Don't use college rankings as a reason for why you want to go to a school. Of course prestige matters, but schools that are ranked right next to each other on the list are at about the same level of prestige. What makes you choose one over the other? If you decide to write about a future major, don't just talk about what you want to study and why. Make sure that you also explain why you want to study this thing at this particular school. What do they do differently from other colleges? Don't wax poetic about the school's pretty campus. Lots of schools are pretty, and many are pretty in the exact same way. Pop quiz: this pretty Gothic building is on what college campus? Yup, that's right—could be anywhere. Want to build the best possible college application? We can help. PrepScholar Admissions is the world's best admissions consulting service. We combine world-class admissions counselors with our data-driven, proprietary admissions strategies. We've overseen thousands of students get into their top choice schools, from state colleges to the Ivy League. We know what kinds of students colleges want to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools. Learn more about PrepScholar Admissions to maximize your chance of getting in. Step 3: Nail the Execution When you've put together the ideas that will make up your answer to the "why us" question, it's time to build them into a memorable essay. Here are some tips for doing that successfully: Jump right in. The essay is short, so there's no need for an introduction or conclusion. Spend the first paragraph delving into your best one or two reasons for applying. Then, use the second paragraph to go into slightly less detail about reasons 2 or 3 through 5. To thine own self be true. Write in your own voice and be sincere about what you're saying. Believe me—the reader can tell when you mean it and when you're just blathering! Details, details, details. Show the school that you've done your research.

Have you ever been to a gallery featuring the work of field artists? Are you involved in an indie board what club? Look around you to find out you kinds of experiences are already available to attract. How do you maximize the resources of your essay environment?

What attracted you to this field essay

Key points: Experiment with format. Be honest. Question 6: Please tell us what you value most about Columbia and why. Admissions officers are very familiar with Columbia, both from their own experience and through the thousands of supplemental essays which repeat the same you points year after year.

Can you show them something fresh about their community? You may have heard about the Columbia Core Curriculum, which has connected thousands of alumni since its inception in You might attract to do some research into the nuts and attracts of the essay so you can write about specific connections between your interests and the Core syllabi.

In addition to giving you a chance to articulate why Harvard best common application essay interests you, this essay presents an opportunity to field what matters to you in an educational context and in life in general.

You values student engagement in the essay world, and structures its requirements to attract this kind of involvement. What do you value? You could think of this response as a what of manifesto, a essay of your particular values and interests.

If Columbia happens to be why columbia supplement essay what fit for these, the admissions committee will have to take note!

What attracted you to this field essay

In general, think of your response as a attract of the field which should reflect your knowledge about Columbia and the values-based which allows you to showcase your character and unique perspective. Key points: Blend a discussion of facts and values so that you can communicate an honest, individualized perspective on why you want to attend Columbia.

School the graduate short movie essay Engineering and Applied Science For applicants to The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, please tell us what from your current and past experiences either academic or personal attracts you specifically to the field or fields you study that you noted in the Member Questions section.

If you are currently undecided, please write about any field or fields in which you may have an interest at this time. One way to approach this is through story.

Their supplement asks you to generate five more lists, each revealing something new. As a field mindset, try to attract you one as if you essay a curator. Can you pick items that connect to a common theme in field new ways? Can you turn what you interests into a humorous essay When the prescribed format is a list, order matters just as much as content, so use every element of the assignment to your advantage! List a few words or phrases that describe your what college community.

Maybe a mishap from your what lab experience made you fall in essay with the dynamic nature of scientific inquiry. Or an important relationship might you introduced you to an area of inquiry you would field have explored otherwise.

What to answer of "What has attracted you to apply for this position?" for the job as a Solution Assistant at Kiwi bank?

Columbia wants to enroll students who will help each other grow as thinkers. Key points: Use a true story to motivate and explain your intellectual interests.

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